Tularemia


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Tularemia

An infectious bacterium that can cause lesions, fever, anorexia and death in humans. It has been used in American, Japanese and Soviet bioweapons programs. See also: Biowarfare.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, 735 SNP differences were found in an analysis of 10 isolates from a respiratory tularemia outbreak in Sweden (9), even though the temporal (maximum 1 year) and geographic (maximum [approximately equal to] 201 km) distances among these isolates were much smaller.
(vi) IV gentamicin started for presumptive tularemia. (vii) Tularemia serology testing and culture from eschar sent.
As proof of concept for the benefits of this approach in the field of tularemia, conjugation of F.
The clinical diagnosis of tularemia is very problematic due to uncommon infection and non specific symptoms.
tularensis subspecies, tularensis (Type A) and holarctica (Type B), cause human tularemia (1,2).
The aim of this study was to review adult cases who presented with inguinal lymphadenopathy (LAP) and were diagnosed with glandular tularemia, which is a rare site of involvement in Turkey.
Ticks are ectoparasitic vectors of serious, potentially life-threatening diseases such as CCHF, Lyme disease, tularemia, and Q fever.
Tularemia in humans manifests in different ways depending to a large extent on the mode of transmission: arthropod bite, direct contact, ingestion or inhalation of the infectious agent.
The report emphasizes that Turkish health experts do not have much information about cases of tularemia, unlike other European countries.
Clinical disease signs of tularemia could include fever and chills with muscle and joint pain, cough or difficulty breathing, swollen lymph nodes with or without skin lesions, conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, or abdominal pain with vomiting and diarrhea, the authors noted.
GSK will conduct safety and toxicology testing, clinical pharmacology studies, clinical studies, and non-clinical studies to support approval to treat illnesses caused by bioterrorism agents like anthrax, plague and tularemia, as well as address antibiotic resistance.
An outbreak of tularemia in Western Black Sea region of Turkey.