trustor

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Trustor

One who gives money and/or other assets to a trust. A trustor usually sets up a trust in order to provide for the financial future of a minor child or mentally incompetent person. A trustor may also set up a trust to benefit a charitable organization. It is important to note that the trustor does not hold or invest the assets once they are given to the trust, as that is the duty of the trustee. See also: Escrow, Charitable trust.

trustor

The person or organization that creates a trust.
References in periodicals archive ?
(39) With benefits for both the trustor's and trustee's interests, "directed trusts are an obvious win for everyone." (40)
The ideas of John Locke as developed in his Second Treatise help to define and describe the fiduciary nature of these wartime declarations and promises; specifically, Locke describes governments as simply trustees who must preserve the rights of the people who are both the trustors and beneficiaries of this fiduciary arrangement.
Over-trust in this article refers to conditions where the trust deposed is independent of the merits of the situation, thereby exposing trustors to greater risks that are invisible to them.
As Mayer, Davis, and Schoorman's (1995) definition of trust suggests, the decision to trust another party reflects the trustor's expectations that the trustee will perform certain behaviors without the trustor having to monitor or control the trustee.
Attorney General's office and the trustor, whose consent must be given if he or she is then living and competent.
As Luhmann suggests, the existence of legal norms is one of the most effective remedies for confining the risk of trust and thus for providing those good reasons which a potential trustor seeks before actually deciding to invest trust in a relationship.
Trust is risky because the trustor's expectations about the future behaviour of the trustee may turn out to be wrong and Luhmann therefore concludes that there are mechanisms to contain the risk of misplaced trust.
According to an attributional perspective, trustees will try to shape trustor's attribution about whether they can be blamed or not for the transgression and if this event can predict trustee's actions in future interactions as well (Dirks, Lewicki, & Zaheer, 2009; Elangovan, Auer-Rizzi, & Szabo, 2007).
Effects of trustors' social identity complexity on interpersonal and intergroup trust.
Trust modification or decanting is often useful to align interests of trustors, beneficiaries, and trustees.
Since the trust will continue long after its creator and immediate members are deceased, many trustors may wish to establish a trust protector to look over the trustee's shoulder.
In our LCT model, three factors, namely the number of the trust certifications, the time decay of the trust certifications and the similarity between the trustors and the certifiers, are comprehensively considered to ease the issue of collusion attacks and make the trust certifications more accurate.