Trustbuster


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Related to Trustbuster: Sherman Antitrust Act

Trustbuster

A person or, less commonly, an organization that seeks to break monopolies into several companies or to shut them down entirely in order to encourage competition in the free market. The word is strongly associated with Theodore Roosevelt, the early 20th-century U.S. president who opposed the early industrial monopolies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given Roosevelt's legendary status as the original trustbuster, a more aggressive antitrust policy seems implausible.
This in turn leads to lesson five: Asian trustbusters face a daunting challenge ahead.
It was Teddy Roosevelt and his Trustbusters nearly 100 years ago.
Aside from being dismissive of property rights, trustbusters narrowly and arbitrarily defined the market as single-user desktop machines with Intel processors, which, as economist Alan Reynolds has noted, eliminated chief Microsoft's competitors like Apple, Sun, and handheld computers from the market definition.
Democracy and Megacorporations May Be Mutually Exclusive: Business: A century ago, the trustbusters battled big business as an economic problem.
McGraw has tried to lift the debates about Progressive-Era business regulation above the mudslinging rhetoric of the Progressive trustbusters themselves.
The original coverage, from Teddy Roosevelt's Trustbusters to the Age of Information Technology, is combined with new commentary that puts the stories in context.
While his views were akin to those of reformist New Deal trustbusters in the sense that both distrusted concentrated economic power in cartels and monopolies, their goals were very different.
government trustbusters broke up the Standard Oil empire founded by John D.
LABOR STANDARDS: Justice Department trustbusters are allowing garment and shoe manufacturers to jointly develop humane workplaces and tell consumers which companies abide by them.
BOSTON -- Competition Policy International, the world's leading antitrust journal, today published its first book, Trustbusters.
While in that room, the UFCW got a chance to make the case that the trustbusters should take on Walmart.