Trustbuster


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Related to Trustbuster: Sherman Antitrust Act

Trustbuster

A person or, less commonly, an organization that seeks to break monopolies into several companies or to shut them down entirely in order to encourage competition in the free market. The word is strongly associated with Theodore Roosevelt, the early 20th-century U.S. president who opposed the early industrial monopolies.
References in periodicals archive ?
WASHINGTON The bets are on: Can EchoStar topper Charlie Ergen convince regulators and trustbusters to approve the proposed merger with DirecTV?
Given Roosevelt's legendary status as the original trustbuster, a more aggressive antitrust policy seems implausible.
(177) For example, Sir Leon Brittan, vice president of the EEC Commission responsible for competition policy and somewhat of a trustbuster, has given reassurance.
The dilemma for would-be trustbusters is how to rein in the power of the big tech companies without disrupting the web of companies that now rely on them.
If any of the would-be trustbusters earns the nomination, 2020 could be the year when the Democratic Party finally starts to fight back.
However, the trustbusters need to listen to complaints from the business community about some regulatory ambiguity, and make clear which business activities are affected by the toughened rule and which are not.
So a populist President has much to gain from going after Amazon, as Ted Roosevelt did with the trustbusters. Something is very wrong in a world where Amazon shares lost $50 billion in a single Nasdaq trading session after Axios reported Trump wanted to "go after" the E-commerce colossus.
Rather than growing the government, would-be trustbusters ought to heed the trustworthy words of former Congressman Ron Paul: "Those concerned about excessive corporate power should join supporters of the free market in repudiating the regulations, taxes, and subsidies that benefit politically powerful businesses."
Trustbuilders and trustbusters - The role of trust cues in interfaces to e-commerce applications, in B.
Asian trustbusters, therefore, have more challenging tasks ahead.
He notes in passing that a century ago, after all, "trustbusters had broken up Standard Oil on moral as much as economic grounds." Well, then: What exactly is the moral case against ExxonMobil today, and does it justify antitrust or other government intervention into how the company behaves?