Trustbuster

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Trustbuster

A person or, less commonly, an organization that seeks to break monopolies into several companies or to shut them down entirely in order to encourage competition in the free market. The word is strongly associated with Theodore Roosevelt, the early 20th-century U.S. president who opposed the early industrial monopolies.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Despite our appreciation of Roosevelt's trust-busting, those of us seeking a just food system will have to work harder now that this government's effort to occupy the food system has collapsed.
When Roosevelt ignored the threats and moved to file the trust-busting suit, he received a hasty visit from J.
Beschloss also details Andrew Jackson's battle with the Second Bank, Teddy Roosevelt's trust-busting crusade, FDR's advocacy of a draft before the 1940 election, and Harry Truman's support of the creation of Israel in 1948.
Somehow, such previous enthusiasms as trust-busting, subsidized farm prices, nationalized railroads, a progressive income tax, a government-run telephone and telegraph system, and a refusal to play European games of imperialism had vanished into the oratorical mists.
It was the trust-busting President Theodore Roosevelt's ally Gifford Pinchot who remarked that `nothing permanent can be accomplished in this country unless it is backed by sound public sentiment'.
Hill and E.H Harriman, two other powerful financiers who together with Morgan formed the Northern Securities Trust that was to become the focus of T.R.'s most renowned exercise in "trust-busting." "Capital" becomes the stubborn and willful George Baer, of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad who led the industrial interests in opposition to the United Mine Workers' great strike of 1902.
David Sanger's meditation on the trust-busting efforts of Theodore Roosevelt and its parallels with today's business troubles ("Busted Trust," CE:August/September 2002) invites some comments.
Pitofsky presided over a period of aggressive trust-busting at the FTC.
Business leaders, emboldened in part by the GOP's mid-1990s electoral surge, mounted a growing campaign against the tax, which dates to 1916, when trust-busting was in vogue.
Such an order from the trust-busting agency to a municipality, normally a victim of corporate bid-rigging, is rare, the report said.
On the way he joined in with Theodore Roosevelt's trust-busting campaign, the organization of the Progressive party, and the discovery and training of younger men including Walter Lippmann.
"We need some good old-fashioned trust-busting, and we're not getting it," says Wellstone.