Trojan Horse

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Related to Trojan horses: Spyware, logic bomb

Trojan Horse

A computer virus that poses as an innocuous program. A Trojan horse appears to be harmless so that the user will install it, but then performs damaging activities like data theft or file deletion. The virus derives its name from the legendary wooden horse used by the Greeks to clandestinely gain access to Troy.
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Trojan malware takes its name from the classical story of the Trojan horse, and initially appears to be something legitimate but will, in fact, do something malicious.
The presented approach in this paper is based on analyzing system-specific events produced by Trojan horses which use message or Bluetooth services in their infection process.
Though confirmed in freshwater protists, microbial Trojan horses "have not been studied very well in a marine habitat," Bernhard said.
Looking at this file with Apple's Property List Editor, we can see that there are a grand total of two types of malware listed: the RSPlug.A Trojan horse, and the iServices Trojan horse.
Like most schools, Penn State has had to deal with the problem of Trojan Horses. One of the latest is the Trojan.Xombe, which disguises itself as a Windows XP update.
Trojan horses are programs that are hidden in software that programmers deliberately include without the user's knowledge.
Whether formulating a strategy to protect against a Trojan horse or a Hurricane Isabel, virus protection is just one piece of a company's overall disaster recovery plan.
A major focus of China's Trojan Horses is the China Overseas Shipping Company (COSCO) and its shadow, the Orient Overseas Container Line (OOCL), whose ships freely sail in and out of U.S.
Trojan Horse viruses which hand over control of a computer to a hacker are set to proliferate, security experts fear.
For information on these and other Trojan Horses, I recommend the Carnegie-Mellon University Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) web site, which has information, advisories, and directions to access counter-measures.
There are three primary constituents: a large opaque globe, an array of vertical screens for each of the 24 plans (Podrecca calls these the Trojan Horses), and a long raised horizontal surface for the contemporary condition.
'Trojan horses, which cannot spread on their own, account for roughly two-thirds of all reported malware.