Trickle Down Theory


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

Trickle Down Theory

An informal term for a macroeconomic theory that a government can best promote growth by providing incentives for persons to produce goods and services. The primary way a government does this is by maintaining low tax rates so that investors and entrepreneurs may invest their money in production. Maintaining low tax rates on the wealthy is one of the most important and controversial aspects of trickle down theory; the theory states that if well off persons have the capital available to produce goods and services, they create jobs and thereby grow the economy. In other words, the growth "trickles down" from the wealthy to the remainder of the economy. Critics contend that this does not happen in reality and that the wealthy are more likely to keep, rather than invest, their money. In the United States, trickle down theory was crucial to the economic policy of the Ronald Reagan administration. See also: Keynesian economics, Monetarism, Thatcherism.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, I would like to introduce the concept of the Indigenous habitation trickle down theory" which states, if you have any group of non-Native people protesting another group of primarily non-Native people for a prolonged period of time, there is a good chance one or several of them will attempt to establish occupancy and respectability via the appropriation and use of some form of Indigenous lodging.
Such was my enthusiasm for her and her albums The Trickle Down Theory of Lord Knows What (2003) and Rare Wood (2004) that when I came across Dimly Lit Wildlife (2003), a book of poems by Valerie Beth Webber, I immediately ordered it.
The trickle down theory is alive and well on Third Avenue--and Pfizer's fortunes are the reason why.