Treaty of Rome

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Treaty of Rome

A 1957 agreement establishing the European Economic Community. Under the Treaty, the EEC shared a parliament and Court of Justice with the European Coal and Steel Community. These organizations eventually merged and formed the basis for what became the European Union.

Treaty of Rome

an agreement signed in 1958 by the six founding countries of the European Economic Community that established the objectives and principles of the modern EUROPEAN UNION. The Treaty provided for the removal of trade restrictions between member countries, free labour and capital mobility, harmonization of tax policies and assistance to poorer regions.
References in periodicals archive ?
They won't - because Government is highly secretive about the financial cost, and is too embarrassed to admit that we lost our sovereignty, when our Constitution was ignored, and the Treaties of Rome (Heath) and Maastricht (Major) were signed.
This year, the EU celebrates the 60th anniversary of the Treaties of Rome, which paved the way for the European Union that we know today: a reunited continent of peace, founded on the values of solidarity, democracy and the rule of law.
"And the Commission will set out such a vision for the future in a White Paper in March 2017, in time for the 60th  anniversary of the Treaties of Rome. We will address how to strengthen and reform our Economic and Monetary Union.
Its ancestor, the European Parliamentary Assembly, came into existence with the entry into force of the Treaties of Rome in 1958.
The next nail in the coffin of European national sovereignty came on March 25, 1957 with the signing by the six ECSC nations (France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg) of the two Treaties of Rome. These created the European Economic Community (EEC or Common Market) and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom), which greatly furthered the process of merging the economic and energy sectors of the member states.
from the treaties of Rome and Paris to the 'reforms' in the Amsterdam treaty.
Macmillan's chief negotiator, Sir Edward Heath MP said in 1962; 'We have all along recognised that the treaties of Rome and Paris had a political as well as an economic objective', and 'we are looking forward to joining you as soon as possible in constructing a Europe united politically as well as economically'.
A new Europe will gradually emerge from the old Europe characterised by the Treaties of Rome, Amsterdam and maybe a future Nice Treaty of 27 or 30 Member States.