U.S. Treasury Security

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U.S. Treasury Security

A tradable debt security owed by the United States government for a certain stated period. Each note has a stated interest rate which is paid semi-annually. Because the United States is seen as a very low-risk borrower, many investors see Treasury security interest rates (especially 10-year Treasury notes) as indicative of the wider bond market. Normally, the interest rate decreases with greater demand for the securities and rises with lower demand. For example, in December 2008, 10-year interest rates were the lowest in history due to deteriorating economic conditions and the consequent desire of investors for low-risk investments. U.S. Treasury securities are sold in auctions, usually once every few weeks. They are secured by the full faith and credit of the United States government. They should not be confused with U.S. savings bonds, which are not tradable, or indirect government obligations, which are not issued by the U.S. government itself. See also: Yield, Bond, Treasury Bond, Treasury Bill, Treasury Note.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, the debt managers asked for "the range of estimates about (1) the possible timing of the end of portfolio normalization and (2) the composition of Treasury security holdings in the SOMA portfolio after normalization.
Treasury security (HighYield_CRS) and by the Chicago Board Options Exchange Market Volatility Index (VIX).
Barclays Plc (LSE: BARC) (NYSE: BCS) is planning to launch a US Treasury Floating Rate Index, a standalone index that will measure the performance of a new Treasury security type with coupons that reset in between quarterly payment dates.
Treasury security issue has ever had its funds earmarked for any
Thus, if an investor in France purchases a Treasury security but the transaction is booked through a London intermediary, the TIC system will report a sale of U.S.
The bill simplifies the Florida Statutes to include the various book-entry systems in which a Treasury security may be maintained in the definition of a closing corporation.
For first-lien loans, the threshold is 3 percentage points above the Treasury security of comparable maturity and, for second-lien loans, 5 percentage points above the Treasury security of comparable maturity.
29) reports that the cost of safekeeping a book-entry Treasury security in the mid-1980s was about $1.50 per year.
* plus the "supply premium" in the Treasury security market for Treasury securities with a maturity of m months.
Series EE savings bonds bought on or after May 1, 1997, earn interest based on five-year Treasury security yields.
(The taxpayer would have made a payment if that yield had decreased.) The benchmarked yield was based on a Treasury security with a term of about one-third the stated term of bonds then issued by the taxpayer.