Algorithmic Trading

(redirected from Trading algorithm)

Algorithmic Trading

A computerized trading system that institutional investors use to make large transactions in securities while affecting their prices as little as possible. Algorithmic trading uses complicated mathematical formulas to identify the ideal times to buy and sell securities in large batches. Usually, algorithmic trading involves dividing trading a large number of securities as smaller groups so as not to cause panic buying or panic selling. Algorithmic trading contrasts with program trading, which is also a computerized system but does not attempt to minimize price changes. Algorithmic trading is also called black box trading.
References in periodicals archive ?
WRIT Media's Pelecoin is a token which is emitted based on the Pelecoin software platform that enables the simultaneous "mining" of a basket of up to fifty crypto-currencies, combined with a trading algorithm that liquidates the most profitable coins and/or trades between them to make the basket more valuable.
I still remember it as the longest two weeks of my life: It started with me losing $50,000 after a partner took off with the proceeds of a stock trading algorithm I had built, and ended with me getting sexually assaulted and nearly raped by a Middle Eastern restaurateur and having to run for my life.
Quantitative Brokers (QB), an independent, global financial technology company providing advanced, dealer-neutral agency algorithms in Futures and US Cash Treasury markets has partnered with TS (formerly TradingScreen), an industry provider of electronic trading solutions, to integrate QB's premium multi-leg spread trading algorithm Legger on TS's TradeSmart platform, the company said.
We round up the best DVD releases of the week MONEY MONSTER (15) LEE Gates (George Clooney, pictured), host of a TV show on the financial market, prepares to interview Diane Lester (Caitriona Balfe), chief communications officer of IBIS Global Capital, whose trading algorithm glitched overnight, losing investors millions.
LEE GATES (George Clooney, left), host of a TV show on the financial market, prepares to interview Diane Lester (Caitriona Balfe), chief communications officer of IBIS Global Capital, whose trading algorithm glitched overnight, losing investors millions.
The taxpayer typically makes upfront payments to the counterparty, which serve as collateral on the contract, and determines a basket of securities or selects a trading algorithm that determines the basket of securities that will dictate the notional value of the contract.
The CFTC proposed the automated trading regulations last year aiming to reduce the risks that a defective high-speed computer trading algorithm could destabilize markets or distort prices.
MONEY MONSTER (15) LEE GATES (George Clooney), gregarious host of a network television show which surveys the financial market, prepares to interview Diane Lester (Caitriona Balfe), chief communications officer of IBIS Global Capital, whose complex trading algorithm glitched overnight, losing investors $800 million.
Lee Gates (Clooney), host o'Connell holds with Clooney of a network television show which covers the financial market, prepares to interview Diane Lester (Caitriona Balfe), chief communications officer of IBIS Global Capital, whose trading algorithm has glitched, losing investors millions With IBIS CEO Walt Camby (Dominic West) unavailable, Diane is concerned she will be a scapegoat.
Lee Gates (Clooney), host o'Connell holds of a network television show which covers the financial market, prepares to interview Diane Lester (Caitriona Balfe), chief communications officer of IBIS Global Capital, whose trading algorithm has glitched, losing investors millions With IBIS CEO Walt Camby (Dominic West) unavailable, Diane is concerned she will be a scapegoat.
Proprietary trading algorithm provider, Global Trading Systems LLC, has hired an executive from Credit Suisse (NYSE CS).
Wall Street Journal reporter Scott Patterson's book on high-speed trading, Dark Pools, recounts the story of Spencer Greenberg, a young math genius who built a hugely successful trading algorithm named Star but later came to have reservations about what he had unleashed on the world.