Trademark

(redirected from Trademark law)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Trademark law: Trademark infringement

Trademark

A distinctive name or symbol used to identify a product or company and build recognition. Trademarks may be registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office.

Trademark

A logo, insignia, or other distinctive sign identifying a company, product, or anything else. A trademark may be registered with a country's patent office and is protected from duplication. An example of a trademark is the unique check mark seen on Nike products. Trademarks are intangible assets because they can help build brand recognition and as such have value.

trademark

A distinctive proprietary emblem, insignia, or name that identifies a particular product or service. A trademark is an intangible asset that may be protected from use by others.
References in periodicals archive ?
306 of the same date and the Trademark Law is to be published within 30 days from the date of issuance of the Implementing regulation and will come into force after 90 days of its publication in the official Gazette.
Trademark law is traditionally concerned with the deceptive seller
Consumer confusion is but a symptom of the disease targeted by trademark law.
extant approaches to the moral dimension of trademark law, identifying a
20) This theory, first propounded in the 1980s, has become the common understanding of trademark law in the United States.
Both the Trademark Law and the Anti-Unfair Competition Law protect against trademark infringement (12) A party may infringe by using a mark that is the same as or similar to another's on the same or similar goods, selling goods that bear another's mark, counterfeiting another's mark, altering another's mark, or otherwise impairing another's right to use his or her mark.
In that case, the court determined that trademark law is meant to prevent protection conferred by registration from granting its proprietor a monopoly on technical solutions or functional characteristics of a product which a user is likely to seek in the products of competitors or from serving as an obstacle to prevent competitors from freely offering for sale products incorporating such technical solutions or functional characteristics in competition with the proprietor of the mark.
The seminar is to concentrate on Trademark Law Treaty (TLT) and Singapore Treaty on the Law of Trademarks / Madrid System for the International Registration/.
In contrast, trademark law has not been subjected to a broadening of secondary liability in recent years, even though digital technologies pose just as much a threat to trademark holders, Bartholomew points out.
Intellectual property lawyers practice primarily in the areas of patent application prosecution, patent infringement litigation, trademark law, and copyright law.
Under China's trademark law, retraction of a trademark may be sought within five years after its registration.