Trademark

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Related to Trade-marks: Trademark registration

Trademark

A distinctive name or symbol used to identify a product or company and build recognition. Trademarks may be registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Trademark

A logo, insignia, or other distinctive sign identifying a company, product, or anything else. A trademark may be registered with a country's patent office and is protected from duplication. An example of a trademark is the unique check mark seen on Nike products. Trademarks are intangible assets because they can help build brand recognition and as such have value.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

trademark

A distinctive proprietary emblem, insignia, or name that identifies a particular product or service. A trademark is an intangible asset that may be protected from use by others.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of this campaign, Owens-Corning attempted to register a trade-mark which would prevent its competitors from using the colour pink in association with insulation products.
More recently, in 2008, Christian Laboutin, S.A., successfully registered a US trade-mark for the colour red applied to the outsole of a shoe.
Thus, while Tiffany's will likely be able to rely on its previous use of robin's egg blue to establish the colour as distinctive, a small company would not be able to register a trade-mark for a colour they have not previously used in the marketplace
When registered, a colour will function in much the same way as any other trade-mark, preventing others from using confusingly similar marks.
The true implications of the coming changes to Canadian Trade-Mark law will likely take some time to determine, as jurisprudence will be needed to define the scope of the new legislation.