Proprietary Information

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Proprietary Information

The information, concepts, designs or anything else that sets a business apart from its competitors and that is therefore kept secret. Other examples of proprietary information may include a company's computer systems, employee salaries, and so forth. Proprietary information may always be kept secret and is never subject to public disclosure. For instance, a fried chicken restaurant is never required to reveal the spices used in its recipe. Proprietary information is also called a trade secret.
References in periodicals archive ?
(62) See Katherine Linton, The Importance of Trade Secrets: New
property protections for trade secrets, copyrights, patents, and
A paper co-authored by create.org and Price-water-house Coopers estimates that trade secret theft ranges from 1% to 3% of the Gross Domestic Product of the U.S.
If you do so, your metalcasting facility may be eligible to recover double damages or attorney fees in trade secret litigation.
As a result civil litigation, two major legal theories began to emerge and subsequently impact both the legal status of trade secrets and remedies associated with their misappropriation (Graves, 2007).
526) More recent case law has also reinforced the property-like attributes of trade secrets (Epstein, 2004).
On the condition that another company creates a competing product using your secret data (a valuable trade secret) or market products to your proprietary customer list (a valuable trade secret), you won't be able to exercise quality control again.
If your trade secret is leaked, the demand for the same resources or supplies you need to create your products-will increase, as competitors start buying them, so they can build competing products.
Pardue is the Chair of the Trade Secrets Committee of the Georgia Bar Intellectual property Section.
Trade secrets can be almost any business information that is valuable because it is secret.
Most states, including Utah, have laws to protect trade secrets through a version of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act.
Therefore, the present paper will focus first its attention on the economic value of trade secrets in our economy and the costs related to cybercrime and cyberes-pionage, then, on the following two paragraphs, it will analyze the U.S.