Trade Expansion Act of 1962

Trade Expansion Act of 1962

Legislation in the United States giving the president the authority to reduce tariffs on imports up to 50% in order to encourage international trade. While the act expired in 1967, the Johnson administration used its authority to reduce tariffs in the Kennedy Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 2018, Washington had imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum exported from India under section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 on the grounds of national security.
Energy Fuels announced that its petition, filed jointly with Ur-Energy under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, has been "successful".
The Trump administration and Commerce Department has used (https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/need-know-section-232-investigations-tariffs/) Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 to justify these tariffs as essential to protect U.S.
(That use of presidential authority is being challenged in court.) Also, in his ongoing use of tariffs against China and US allies, Trump has utilised a presidential power under the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 that lets him apply tariffs when he sees US national security at stake.
trade war arsenal Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 which lets the president impose tariffs on imports if the Commerce Department deems them a threat to national security.
trade war arsenal Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 to investigate whether auto imports are a threat to U.S.
"the best place to produce steel in the world." Yet as the official verbiage has it, "On March 8, 2018, the President issued Proclamations 9704 and 9705 on Adjusting Imports of Steel and Aluminum into the United States, under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended (19 U.S.C.
On March 8, President Donald Trump signed proclamations imposing a 25% tariff on imported steel and a 10% tariff on imported aluminum pursuant to Section 232(b) of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. The tariffs went into effect March 23, and the proclamations do not set a date on which the duties will expire.
The United States earlier in 2018, and following lengthy investigations under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, (77) found that imports of steel and aluminum were a threat to the national security of the United States.
The big guns were rolled out by the Commerce Department in its February 2018 recommendation for tariffs on steel and aluminum under the rarely used "national-security" authority of Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. The tariffs were steep 25 percent for steel and 10 percent for aluminum and they heavily targeted allies.
Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 allows the president to impose tariffs or quotas if an investigation by the U.S.