Trading Dollars

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Trading Dollars

Informal; a term for a company breaking even on an investment. For example, an oil company may spend $1 million placing an oil pump on an unproven reserve and drill only $1 million worth of oil. In this situation, the company trades $1 million in investment for an equal number of dollars from the oil, hence the term.
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Gross margins will come under pressure from both price transparency (retailers will need to keep prices low to stay competitive) and a reduced share of trade spending (vendors will allocate fewer trade dollars to secure shelf space in physical stores and more to promote brands in the digital realm, where retailers are but one of many ways to reach consumers).
Yet rising trade tensions could threaten to undermine this trend, if slumping trade with China reduces recycling of trade dollars into U.S.
The Sudan central bank has said that it has decided to weaken the exchange rate at which banks can trade dollars.
In 2002, Dan Cusack had only recently entered Sudbury's family restaurant business when he found customers asking if he accepted "trade dollars." When he replied with a puzzled "No," diners walked out the door.
He explained there are parties who trade dollars for completely legitimate business reasons but want to stay away from the prying eyes of banks or regulators due to security concerns.
Promotional Saturation: Because of the lower returns on trade promotion spending, manufacturers are only exacerbating the problem, often earmarking more trade dollars for everyday low price strategies.
bank or say why it no longer wished to trade dollars with Angola.
CBE allows banks to trade dollars with higher or lower prices than the official rate by up to 10 piasters, while exchange offices get an additional range of five piasters.
The notion that such an intricate sanctions regime can be simply snapped back and that trade dollars flowing into Iran can be reversed is delusional.
There are 5.195 trillion foreign trade dollars flying in and out of the US every year.
The rates at which banks are allowed to trade dollars are determined by the results of central bank sales, giving the bank effective control over official exchange rates.
The rates banks are allowed to trade dollars at are determined by the results of the central bank sales, giving the bank effective control over official exchange rates.