Tokugawa Currency

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Tokugawa Currency

A gold, silver and bronze coin system that served as Japan's currency between 1601 and 1867. Originally used for international trade, export of Tokugawa coins was eventually restricted because of the scarcity of precious metals in Japan. See also: Japanese yen.
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On the efficiency of Dojima as a hedge institution, see Matao Miyamoto, Edo Jidai no Kome Shijo: Sono Kozo to Kino [The Structure and Function of Tokugawa Era Rice Markets], GENDAI KEIZAI, 48, 56-62 (Spring 1982).
A samurai whose daimyo lost in battle against the Tokugawa also lost his samurai rank and became a commoner.
The first section of the book, "The Context of Contention," does a very solid job of introducing both nonspecialist and specialist alike to the contours of Tokugawa society and changes which he views as pertinent to the forms and content of contention.
Although early Portuguese and Dutch trade with Japan was eventually restricted by Tokugawa seclusion policies, a large bullion-for-silk trade with China persisted.
For most of the Tokugawa period the 20,000-30,000 Ainu were under the suzerainty of Matsumae, an autonomous domain under the authority of the Tokugawa shogunate.
Sato shows that the Tokugawa years witnessed important "advances in the organization of farm work, the technology of agronomy, and the use of fertilizers and crop varieties".
Following unification under the Tokugawa shogunate in 1600, hundreds of urban nuclei--ports, temple towns, post stations, and castle towns--were established or expanded, attracting warriors, merchants, artisans, and rural migrants by the thousands.
The journals of the town elder of Ono Town, in the central mountains of central Japan, chronicle 49 years between 1740 and 1870, says Ehlers, and draws on them to study the government in the context of the Tokugawa status order.
In this study, the author explores the Tokugawa shoguns' political use of death rituals, particularly their injunctions against playing music in the aftermath of someone's passing.
Hideyoshi was, at that time, locked in a death struggle with the Tokugawa clan headed by Ieyasu.
Drawing on 60 primary documents dealing with the Tokugawa period of shoguns (hereditary military government leaders), 1650-1868, Vaporis (history/Asian studies, U.