Title IV Funds

Title IV Funds

All monies that the federal government administers as financial aid under the Higher Education Act of 1965.
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As a result, ABC was not able to draw down Title IV funds for nearly six months; consequently, the College was required to operate with cash advances from the local banks to keep the doors of the College open.
* Tier 1: An arrangement between an institution and a third-party servicer that performs one or more of the functions associated with processing direct payments of title IV funds on behalf of the institution, and that offers one or more financial accounts to students and parents.
schools and its Canadian schools and facilitate the "teach out" of 12 schools (i.e., enable only enrolled students to complete their degrees) that the DOE had stipulated would not be eligible for Title IV funds for new students.
If colleges and universities don't adopt stricter student ID verification technology beyond PINs and passwords as detailed in the final audit report by the Office of Inspector General, continued access to Title IV funds, a major source of revenues for most schools, may be in jeopardy.
The agency is reminding schools that they may be eligible to offer Title IV funds under the direct assessment provision of the Higher Education Act, and it has supplied step-by-step instructions on how to apply.
(5) billion in grants and loans to students through Title IV programs) Title IV funds go toward programs at every degree level, to traditional and nontraditional students, and to students at public, private nonprofit, and private for-profit colleges and universities alike.
As the largest provider of financial aid in higher education, with about $134 billion in Title IV funds provided to students in fiscal year 2010, the Department of Education (Education) has a considerable interest in distance education.
The push to boost enrollment and gain access to Title IV funds has long created legal and regulatory trouble for for-profit colleges, much of it involving allegedly improper incentive compensation of recruiters.
GAO was asked to determine (1) how the student loan default profile of proprietary schools compares with that of other types of schools and (2) the extent to which Education's policies and procedures for monitoring student eligibility requirements for federal aid at proprietary schools protect students and the investment of Title IV funds. To address these objectives, GAO analyzed data and records from Education, examined Education's policies and procedures, reviewed relevant research studies, conducted site visits and undercover investigations at proprietary schools, and interviewed officials from Education, higher education associations, and state oversight agencies.
Similar to the ESEA, several provisions might need to be revisited--50% rules relating to distance education programs, student loan forbearance period, and the "Return of Title IV Funds" calculation--to provide students and IHEs with additional relief.
Department of Educations Office of Inspector General (OIG) to immediately investigate reports that millions in federal Title IV funds have not been paid to students attending Dream Center Education Holdings (DCEH) schools operated by a court-appointed receiver and that additional federal funds may have disappeared as a result of questionable sales, consummated with the Departments assistance, of other DCEH campuses.
Some of these issues, such as the return of Title IV funds made late, occur because of a lack of communication between offices at an institution.