factor

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Related to Tissue factor: thrombin, Tissue factor pathway inhibitor

Factor

A financial institution that buys a firm's accounts receivable and collects the accounts.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Factor

A third party that buys a firm's accounts receivable. If a firm is not confident in its ability to collect on its credit sales, it may sell the right to receive payment to the factor at a discount. The factor then assumes the credit risk associated with the accounts receivable. This provides the firm immediate access to working capital, which is important, especially if the firm has a cash flow problem. The price of factoring is determined by the creditworthiness of the firm's customer, not of the firm itself. It is also known as accounts receivable financing.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

factor

A firm that purchases accounts receivable from another firm at a discount. The purchasing firm then attempts to collect the receivables.

factor

To sell accounts receivable to another party at a discount from face value. Thus, a firm in need of cash to pay down short-term debt may decide to factor its accounts receivable to another firm.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

factor

  1. a firm that purchases TRADE DEBTS from client firms. See FACTORING.
  2. a firm that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. an input (for example raw material, labour, capital) which is used to produce a good or provide a service.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

factor

  1. 1a FACTOR INPUT that is used in production (see NATURAL RESOURCES, LABOUR, CAPITAL).
  2. a business that buys in bulk and performs a WHOLESALING function.
  3. a business that buys trade debts from client firms (at some agreed price below the nominal value of the debts) and then arranges to recover them for itself. See FACTOR MARKET, FACTORING.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Xuezhikang, extract of red yeast rice, inhibited tissue factor and hypercoagulable state through suppressing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.
Barbieri et al., "Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species: a common pathway for PAR1- and PAR2-mediated tissue factor induction in human endothelial cells," Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, vol.
Butenas, "The role of the tissue factor pathway in initiation of coagulation," Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis, vol.
Correlation of Weekly Dialysis Duration with Expression of Tissue Factor. The expression of tissue factor on monocytes was significantly decreased in comparison to increasing duration of haemodialysis sessions (p = 0.031) (Figure 4).
Cordazzo et al., "High glucose potentiates and renin-angiotensin blockade downregulates LPS-induced tissue factor expression in human mononuclear cells," Thrombosis Research, vol.
Two colors and light scattering properties were applied to determine the percentage of tissue factor positive platelet (CD142 +ve, CD61 +ve events) figure (1) and percentage of reticulated platelets (TO +ve, CD61+ve events) figure (2)
Tencati et al., "A novel class of antioxidants inhibit LPS induction of tissue factor by selective inhibition of the activation of ASK1 and MAP kinases," Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol.
(7) As in mammals, the tissue factor (TF)-factor Vila complex initiates the process of hemostasis; which after, further amplification and propagation culminates in a thrombin burst in which fibrinogen is converted into fibrin.
Tissue factor expression as a possible determinant of thromboembolism in ovarian cancer.
As soon as the virus reaches the human body, it establishes a specific strategy, by eliminating the cells it has no use for--lymphocytes--through so-called "bystander" apoptosis, sustaining the useful cells--monocyte/macrophages, dendritic cells and endothelial cells--and activating the tissue factor.
Tissue factor: pathophysiology and cellular biology.

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