Times-interest-earned ratio

Times-interest-earned ratio

Earnings before interest and tax, divided by interest payments.

Times Interest Earned

A measure of a company's ability to service its debts. It is calculated by dividing the company's earnings before interest and taxes by the total interest payable on its debts, expressed as a ratio. Investors prefer publicly-traded companies to have a middling times-interest-earned ratio. A low ratio indicates an inability to service debts, while too high a ratio indicates a lack of debt that investors may find undesirable.
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Finally, we compare returns of firms with low times-interest-earned ratio with firms with high times-interest-earned ratios.
We also find that firms with higher times-interest-earned ratios (indicating higher debt servicing capacity) suffered lower stock price declines than firms with lower times-interest-earned ratio.
0] (2): The stock market reaction to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks is more pronounced (negative) for low times-interest-earned ratio firms than for high times-interest-earned ratio firms.
We define the times-interest-earned ratio as operating income before depreciation (compustat # 13) divided by interest expense (compustat # 15).
The mean (median) times-interest-earned ratio is -10.
Table 5 uses two portfolios of firms sorted on times-interest-earned ratio.
In other words, a higher times-interest-earned ratio (or capacity to serve debt) means a more positive (or less negative) market reaction.
The times-interest-earned ratio is operating income before depreciation (compustat # 13) divided by interest expense (compustat # 15).
The times-interest-earned ratio examines how many times margins can cover interest expense.
Its times-interest-earned ratio also weakened, even going negative twice.
In 2003, the largest agriculture cooperatives had an average times-interest-earned ratio of 12.
The times-interest-earned ratio measures a company's ability to make interest payments on debt.