time management

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time management

  1. the organization of a manager's working practices so as to make the optimum use of the manager's scarce time.
  2. the process of reducing the amount of time taken in developing new product ideas into products, and getting them on to the market. Firms which are able to shorten new product lead times can often gain a significant COMPETITIVE ADVANCE over rival suppliers. See NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, CONCURRENT ENGINEERING.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in past studies, seven time-management skills or behaviors can be considered essential to effective time management due to their repetitive prominence in the literature: (a) time analysis, (b) planning, (c) goal setting, (d) prioritizing, (e) scheduling, (f) organizing, and (g) establishing new and improved time habits (Barkas, 1984; Hellsten and Rogers, 2009).
(1996).A comparison between the time-management skills and academic performance of mature and traditional-entry university students.
Assessing time-management skills in terms of age, gender, and anxiety levels: A study on nursing and midwifery students in Turkey.
MAKING COMPARISONS AND INFERENCES: Of the four kids quoted (Riley, Remi, Craig, and Dana), whose time-management style is most like yours?
The present version came up with 71 items sub-divided under the following: finance, time-management, career, academic ability, personality type, drug concerns, family assertiveness/ communication, relationship, self-evaluation, anxiety, depression, differential treatment and sexual harassment.
Frings speaks in his time-management seminars and workshops about using systems to manage daily operations.
But using these concepts in our private lives along with a mix of time-management strategies--so tried and true in the office--can help put us on the road to achieving more balance.
Author Steve Prentice, president of Bristall Morgan Inc., describes how to apply practical time-management skills to real-world situations: holding time-effective meetings, dealing with distractions, learning to focus, and coping with unrealistic workloads.
This is no formula time-management piece recommending ledgers and schedules.
Allow us to offer a number of time-tested time-management ideas.
Time-management tip Focus on what's most important, delegate, only attend meetings that are productive and useful, devote some part of each day to be free of interruptions.
So what would you do if time-management pioneer Alan Lakein told you to "think small?"