Expiration date

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Expiration date

The last day (in the case of American-style) or the only day (in the case of European-style) on which an option may be exercised. For stock options, this date is the Saturday immediately following the third Friday of the expiration month; brokerage firms may set an earlier deadline for notification of an option holder's intention to exercise. If Friday is a holiday, the last trading day will be the preceding Thursday.

Expiration Date

The date by which an option contract is abandoned and becomes worthless unless it is exercised. In an option contract, the holder has the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell (depending on the type of option) the underlying asset within a certain period of time. The expiration date is the time at which the holder will lose the right to exercise the option. A European option can only be exercised on the expiration date, while an American option can be exercised at any point prior to the expiration date.

expiration date

The last day on which an option holder may exercise an option. This date is stated in the contract at the time the option is written.

Expiration date.

The expiration date is the day on which an options contract expires and becomes worthless. Listed options always expire on the Saturday following the third Friday of their expiration month.

For example, if you hold an American-style September equity option, you can exercise it any time before the end of trading on the third Friday in September, or whatever cutoff time your brokerage firm sets. In contrast, European-style options can be exercised only at expiration, usually on Friday.

Under specific circumstances, listed options will be exercised automatically at expiration unless the owner gives instructions not to exercise them.

Unlike the standard term of a listed option, the expiration date of an over-the-counter option is negotiated at the time of the trade.

References in periodicals archive ?
The spot price of the underlying asset is that of oil, the volatility of the underlying asset is that of oil, the strike price is the full cost per barrel and the time to expiration is that of each option.
As the time to expiration increases, so does the value of the option.
We combine this volatility estimate with [Mathematical Expression Omitted], the risk-free rate, and time to expiration to calculate an expected call price, [Mathematical Expression Omitted], using the dividend-adjusted Black-Scholes model.
2]t/2)/[sigma] [square root of t,] N(d) + cumulative normal probability density function, X = exercise price associated with the option, t = time to expiration of the option, [[sigma].
Note, however, that the first four inputs, time to expiration, exercise price, underlying commodity price, and interest rates, can be readily observed, so there is unlikely to be a difference of opinion about these inputs.
3 point but were still below fair value, a formula that evaluates pricing by taking into account interest rates, dividends and time to expiration on the contract.
1 points and were roughly even with fair value, a formula that evaluates pricing by taking into account interest rates, dividends and time to expiration on the contract.
S&P 500 futures rose 4 points and were above fair value, a formula that evaluates pricing by taking into account interest rates, dividends and time to expiration on the contract.
4 points and were about even with fair value, a formula that evaluates pricing by taking into account interest rates, dividends and time to expiration on the contract.
6 points and were well below fair value, a formula that evaluates pricing by taking into account interest rates, dividends and time to expiration on the contract.