Time Standard


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Time Standard

A legal or customary measure of the rate at which time passes. Most time standards are based upon the earth's rotation, that is, upon the passage of days. Nearly all modern time standards divide time into seconds, minutes and hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
White said he had obtained information from the court that showed since 2006, the court has only met the 180-day time standard 45 percent of the time, and for 2015, it was only 29 percent.
Department of Defense, but it also serves as the time standard for many civilian applications that utilize the Global Positioning System (GPS) as a timing reference.
The environment is integral to the work of the nurse and cannot be removed while the creation of accurate time standards has been an indirect causal variable that impacts the outcomes.
And while we know that employers without current earned paid sick time standards will incur some additional cost, experience in other cities shows the overall cost to business to be small, less than 1 percent of payroll on average.
Another showed that North East Ambulance Service's performance against the Category A response time standard within eight minutes was 77.9% - with the national average at 75%.
"After this, due to access problems and reduced driving speeds, the eight minute response time standard was difficult to achieve.
They also knew what the load barn time standard was and were trying to keep pace.
We gave each shooter 10 rounds at each station with a time standard for each range.
In a detailed study, the city determined it could not meet the 1710's turnout time standard.
At the same time Standard & Poor's assigned its 'BBB' long-term corporate credit rating to Brussels Airport Holding SA/NV (BAH), a new holding company established by Brussels Airport's ultimate shareholders Macquarie Airports (Brussels) SA (MABSA) and Societe Federale de Participations et d'Investissement/Federale Participatie-en Investeringsmaatschappij (SFPI/FPIM).
They weren't going to meet the time standard, but they were still working fast.
For the 23rd time since 1972, the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service added an extra second to the time standard, a worldwide network of some 200 atomic clocks.