Lumber

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Lumber

Wood cut in such a way as to be used for building. Lumber may be traded as a commodity and is especially important in the construction industry. Sustainable woodcutting has become a significant issue in the lumber industry.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The geometry consists of a 1:6 scale model of a 74-ton timber truck with 1-3-2-3 axle configuration, Figure 2.
Seen in [15] the cab is responsible for most (57 %) of the drag for an unloaded timber truck, as it causes a large low pressure wake.
52.8 % of the total drag is generated from the cab itself for the baseline configuration, possibly indicating were most of the drag can be reduced for an unloaded timber truck.
In this paper the aerodynamics of an unloaded timber truck is investigated by use of CFD.
This paper show that a small and simple modification can lower the drag significantly for an unloaded timber truck or other similar shaped vehicles.
[15.] Ekman, P., Gardhagen, R., Virdung, T, Karlsson, M., "Aerodynamics of an Empty Timber Truck - a Numerical and Experimental Investigation," Presentation at Second International Conference in Numerical and Experimental Aerodynamics of Road Vehicles and Trains, Gothenburg, June 2016.
Today in Sweden, around 2000 timber trucks transport around six billion ton kilometers every year.
In 2015, about 2000 timber trucks in Sweden, hauled about six billion ton-km (metric ton kilometers) of timber [3].
One of the areas is to increase the maximum weight of the timber trucks from 60 tons to 74 tons, without increasing the length of the vehicles, Figure 1.
However, for timber trucks only a few studies exist for its aerodynamics [3,4, 12, 13,14].
This feature also occurs for timber trucks but is, however, a bit different when the truck is unloaded.
As this drag reduction shield does not require substantial modifications of bulkhead, bunks and stakes it should be possible to implement it on existing timber trucks. As the shield is placed on the outward face of the bulkhead, first bunk and stake pair it should have little or no contact with the timber when fully loaded.