TIGER

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TIGER

Treasury Investment Growth Receipt

A Treasury security whose coupons have been stripped by Merrill Lynch. TIGRs therefore pay no interest. They are sold at a significant discount from par and mature at par. TIGRs fluctuate in price, sometimes dramatically, because changes in interest rates have made them more or less desirable. TIGRs can be invested IRAs and other pension accounts; they are also exempt from state and local taxes. They were originally issued between 1982 and 1986, becoming more-or-less obsolete when the U.S. Treasury began issuing its own stripped bonds. They still exist, but are fairly uncommon investments. See also: zero-coupon bonds, STRIPS.

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References in periodicals archive ?
In the last century alone, the wild tiger population has dropped an astonishing 96 percent, to less than 4,000 left in the wild due to habitat loss and pervasive poaching.
In the last century alone, the wild tiger population has dropped an astonishing 96%, to less than 4,000 left in the wild due to habitat loss and pervasive poaching.
One assumption is that the deer and tiger populations at the 15 sites used for the regression analysis were all at equilibrium, but poaching of both ungulates (Jathanna et al.
There are fewer than 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild, among a global tiger population of just 3,200 -- down from 100,000 a century ago.
If countries succeed in doubling tiger numbers by 2022, how will the tiger population compare with that of 2000?
The Malenad-Mysore landscape in southern India has 220 adult tigers, one of the world's largest tiger populations, thanks largely to intensive protection of its 'source site', the Nagarahole National Park, in the 1970s.
Others noted there are several tiger populations not mentioned in the study that have a good chance for recovery - such as in Bangladesh and Thailand - and can't wait for help.
The call came at a multinational meeting in Thailand where representatives from 13 countries with wild tiger population are discussing efforts to pull the world's remaining tigers back from the brink of extinction.
The Bank hopes to invest in high-priority conservation actions, ensure that its own infrastructure investments do not damage tiger populations, and also support investigations and economic analyses of key issues such as poaching and habitat conversion.
A thriving tiger population made the 152-square-mile Ranthambore Park famous at the end of the 1980s.
While being famed for its tiger population, the park is also home to 272 species of bird and 30 species of mammal including leopards, sloth bears, jungle cats and wild boar
Former ritual hunting expeditions and simple punitive hunting drives, and the current proliferation of safaris and professional trophy hunters, together with a reduction of suitable habitats, have all drastically reduced tiger populations. At the beginning of the 20th century, the many different habitats in India as a whole contained more than 40,000 tigers, but only 1,800 were recorded in a census carried out in 1970.