Tiger Economy

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Tiger Economy

A collective name given to the economies of East and Southeast Asia, which experienced nearly unprecedented growth, especially in the 1980s and early 1990s. The Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s ended the idea that the tiger economies were unstoppable, though most have recovered well and remain important players in the global economy. See also: Keiretsu, chaebol, ASEAN.
References in periodicals archive ?
Already the giant Asian tiger countries are witnessing declining exports and forecasting a further showdown.
Nearly half a century ago, most of the current high income Asian Tiger countries were on an almost equal footing with Pakistan having weak economies comparable to sub-Saharan Africa.
The four Asian countries of South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore are known as the Asian Tiger countries due to their highly-developed, free market economies.
India is working seriously to preserve its tiger population ('Tiger countries agree to preserve big-cat habitats', Gulf News, April 18).
WWF is working with all tiger countries to achieve the 'Tx2' goal of doubling the population by 2022, the next Chinese Year of the Tiger.
Nepal is among the 13 tiger countries which has been working in close cooperation with organization for conservation of the wild mammal.
In 2008, World Bank President Robert Zoellick organized the Global Tiger Initiative, targeting the summit in 2010 the Chinese Year of the Tiger as the time tiger countries would figure out a plan, now aimed at doubling the number of cats in the wild by 2022, the next Year of the Tiger.
Few months back Ethiopia announced its economic growth has reached double digits and soon will equate the Asian Tiger countries. In contradiction to what has been said though, Ethiopia is now asking assistance to feed over 4.5 million of its population some in dire situation.
At first sight, one is tempted to think that it deals more with economic development in the East Asian "Tiger countries," and the aspiration of African countries to become like them than it does with Ghanaian cultural values and business practices.
TV station program buyers from the Asian tiger countries beset by economic woes - have cut back on their attendance.
Second, governments in the Tiger countries intervened heavily in the economy, protecting and subsidizing local enterprises in a variety of ways.
"The visit reflects President Al Sissi's vision to open up to all countries of the world and benefit from the successful experiences of the Asian Tiger countries in South-East Asian," the paper commented.