New Deal

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New Deal

a government programme introduced in 1998 aimed at reducing youth UNEMPLOYMENT and long-term unemployment amongst older workers. Persons qualifying for the youth scheme must be aged between 18-24 and have received the JOBSEEKERS ALLOWANCE for at least 6 months. Participants in the scheme are offered support and advice in seeking paid work for 4 months (the ‘Gateway’ period). After this if they are still unemployed they are placed on one of 4 options; (1) subsidized employment (2) work with a voluntary organization(3) work with an environmental task force (each of the options lasts 6 months) or (4) a one year training or education course.

Persons qualifying for the long-term unemployed scheme must be aged 25 or over and have received the jobseekers allowance for at least two years.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

New Deal

a government programme introduced in 1998 aimed at reducing youth UNEMPLOYMENT and long-term unemployment amongst older workers. Persons qualifying for the youth scheme must be aged between 18 and 24 and have received the JOBSEEKERS ALLOWANCE for at least six months. Participants in the scheme are offered support and advice in seeking paid work for four months (the ‘Gateway’ period). After this, if they are still unemployed, they are placed on one of four options:
  1. subsidized employment;
  2. work with a voluntary organization;
  3. work with an environmental task force (each of these options lasts six months); or
  4. a one-year training or education course. Persons qualifying for the long-term unemployed scheme must be aged 25 or over and have received the jobseekers allowance for at least two years. See SUPPLY-SIDE ECONOMICS.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The book is clearly in dialogue with the "global turn" in historiography and is intended as a corrective to historical interpretations of the New Deal that view it primarily or even exclusively as a domestic issue or that privilege its study from a local perspective.
* Jason Taylor, Central Michigan University, and Todd Neumann, University of Arizona and NBER, "The Effect of Institutional Regime Change Within the New Deal on Industrial Output and Labor Markets"
Maher's effort to reframe the political history of the New Deal is also something with which historians will now have to reckon.
Scholars reevaluating FDR and the New Deal include, among others, Robert Higgs (Crisis and Leviathan [New York: Oxford University Press, 1987]; Against Leviathan [Oakland, Calif.: Independent Institute, 2004]; and a number of journal articles), Gary Dean Best (Pride, Prejudice, and Politics." Roosevelt versus Recovery, 1933-1938 [New York: Praeger, 1990]), Richard Vedder and Lowell Gallaway (Out of Work [New York: Holmes and Meier, 1993], as well as several journal articles), Jim Couch and William Shughart II (The Political Economy of the New Deal [Northampton, Mass.: Edward Elgar, 1998]), Gene Smiley (Rethinking the Great Depression [Chicago: Ivan R.
Some economists defend the New Deal on grounds it was not given time to stimulate the economy because the Supreme Court declared it unconstitutional in 1935.
"The majority of New Deal students attend high schools outside of the New Deal area," Mr Taylor said.
Barton equivocated on the New Deal. Mildly anti-Semitic or pro-Hitler remarks sat uncomfortably in his record next to apparently sincere professions of religious toleration.
Despite the New Deal's national efforts its distribution had to be monitored against local acts of discrimination.
A recent MORI survey of residents in the New Deal area revealed the number of people who are worried about burglary has fallen from 52% to 45%, which is lower than the national average, while the number of people who are satisfied with the police has risen from 60% to 66%.
ITEM: The Washington Post for January 16 compared Franklin Roosevelt's "New Deal" and George Bush's "Ownership Society" and said about changing Social Security funding: "This shift--from the New Deal to the Ownership Society--is a sea change in the way Americans view the relationship between themselves and the government, and between themselves and the rest of society.
The new scheme - Building on the New Deal (Bond) - is a revision of the original New Deal.