bottleneck

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Bottleneck

In project management and other fields, a situation in which output is limited by the lowest capacity system in the project. For example, the output of book publishing is limited by how quickly writers write, regardless of how quickly books can be edited and printed. Bottlenecks have a wide variety of applications in business, technology and elsewhere.

bottleneck

a hold-up in some part of a PRODUCTION LINE which disrupts the smooth flow of work. See PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING, OPTIMISED PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, being able to identify the bottleneck at any moment in time made it possible, through the intelligent scheduling of resources and material, to substantially increase the plant's throughput.
The economic values listed for the bottleneck are cumulative over the construction period and the 20-year useful life of the project.
Based on core technology developed at BAE Systems (formerly Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company), TeraConnect devices eliminate the bottlenecks that currently limit data transmission between digital platforms and enabling greater throughput in advanced communications and computing equipment.
For too long, layer 2 has been the bottleneck halting broadband development in its tracks -- and now, we're eliminating that bottleneck," Burr said.
Over the past few years, as new networking technologies have been adopted by users and carriers to improve Internet access and content delivery speed, the `root cause' bottleneck has become exposed - the bottleneck that results from trying to re-purpose traditional enterprise storage systems and servers to solve the Internet content delivery problem," said Bopardikar.
This prevents the bottlenecks experienced with SNIP, but requires additional programming to enable all of the segments to communicate with each other.
The study said relieving the bottlenecks can save lives, help the environment, save time and fuel, and enhance work productivity.
The report, an update of a study originally conducted in 1999, specifically quantifies how these traffic chokepoints burden the public with severe delays, degraded safety, worsened air quality and wasted fuel consumption, and it details the major benefits that will accrue from uncorking the bottlenecks.