Internet

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Internet

a global ‘web’ of COMPUTER networks which use the same agreed ‘protocols’ (agreed methods of communication). The WORLD WIDE WEB (www or ‘the web’) is a vast collection of computers able to support multi-media formats and accessible via web-browsers' (search and navigation tools). Data stored in these computers (‘servers’) is organized into pages with hypertext links, each page having a unique address.

Connection to the web usually requires access to a personal computer, a modem and a telephone line, although it is now possible to receive television-based Internet services.

The Internet is increasingly used by businesses for the conduct of electronic commerce (E-COMMERCE, for short), and has thus provided a new powerful alternative means to conventional distribution channels of selling goods. See MARKET.

In 2004 around 9 million households in the UK owned personal computers with some 7 million of these using the Internet. The number of people worldwide using the Internet is estimated at 300 million and rising rapidly. See CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

Internet

a global ‘web’ of COMPUTER networks that use the same agreed ‘protocols’ (agreed methods of communication). The WORLD WIDE WEB (www or ‘the web’) is a vast collection of computers able to support multimedia formats and accessible via ‘web-browsers’ (search and navigation tools). Data stored in these computers (‘servers’) is organized into pages with hypertext links, each page having a unique address.

Connection to the web usually requires access to a personal computer, a modem and a telephone line, although it is now possible to receive television-based Internet services.

The Internet is increasingly used by businesses for the conduct of electronic commerce (E-COMMERCE, for short) and has thus provided a new powerful alternative means to conventional distribution channels of selling goods. This has helped many smaller firms to break into markets previously dominated by large companies.

See BARRIERS TO ENTRY.

Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To our surprise, the results indicated that few nursing homes had staff members trained in Internet use--or even had access to the Internet. And of those nursing homes that did have Internet access, none made it available to their residents.
While these statistics motivate doom-and-gloom scenarios from some quarters, other studies present a wealth of evidence that the Internet is increasing work-related productivity:
In the meantime, the Internet consumer is benefiting--finding more choices for less money.
The obvious way to combat this problem is to divide the Internet into several distinct units that cannot interface with one another.
In those days, a Forbes or Fortune writer compared the rush to the internet to the California gold rush: The money being made more often goes to the suppliers than to the actual gold (or internet) rushers.
Now we have the rapidly escalating tidal wave of the Internet. For those of us in the Boomer generation, this is likely to be another grief cycle in which the majority of us will get stuck (again).
"The basic idea of net neutrality was formulated in the early days of the Internet as an engineering concept often called the 'end-to-end' principle." This principle holds that the functionality of the Internet should be at the ends of the network, with only "dumb pipes" in between to transmit data without modification.
Since statistics show that many of the UPMS students will eventually attend college and be educators, commercial business leaders and consumers of the future, it is important to document their attitudes and understandings to learn from their successes (and failures) with the Internet.
The one constant is that teens take to the Internet like ants to a summer picnic.
ICANN is essentially the mapmaker for the Internet. It handles the technical operations of the root servers of the Internet, mapping the relatively easy-to-remember domain names like apple.com or whitehouse.gov to the unique numerical address assigned to that domain.
Napster became a popular peer-to-peer network for sharing free music over the Internet. Now, P2P users are sharing everything from PowerPoint presentations to free Internet phone calls.
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