The Intelligent Investor


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The Intelligent Investor

A 1949 book by Benjamin Graham promoting value investing, which is an investment strategy in which one seeks securities thought to be undervalued. That is, one tries to buy securities at prices lower than their true value. In The Intelligent Investor, Graham uses the character "Mr. Market," who offers securities at different prices every day. According to Graham, the smart investor waits to buy a security until Mr. Market offers a good price. See also: Buy and hold.
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Although the performance of the PSEi could get worse before it gets better, the intelligent investor should already be mentally prepared to buy this correction.
"The investor's chief problem--even his worst enemy--is likely to be himself," said Benjamin Graham, who authored "The Intelligent Investor," one of the most widely read investment guides.
"Even the intelligent investor is likely to need considerable will power to keep from following the crowd."
Market in his book The Intelligent Investor to describe the behavior of the market.
In any event, greater opportunities for raising capital in the SBRE market than ever before are coming to the fore, and that can be only a good thing for the intelligent investor who wants a well-performing and truly diverse investment portfolio, and is willing to learn how to assess the new opportunities being brought into the open light for the first time in over four generations.
Browne (Wiley, $20), "Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits'' by Philip Fisher (Wiley, $23), "John Neff on Investing'' by John Neff (Wiley, $30) and "The Intelligent Investor'' by Benjamin Graham (Collins Business, $23).
When most advisors hear Jack Bogle's name, they likely think of mutual fund giant Vanguard Group, which he founded in 1974, serving as CEO and chairman of the board until he retired in 2000; or perhaps of his 1999 best-selling book "Common Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor." In either case, they probably associate Bogle with index funds--particularly the Vanguard S&P 500 Index Fund, upon which Vanguard built its success.
But as legendary value investor Ben Graham wrote in The Intelligent Investor (Collins Business; $21.99): "The stock market is a voting machine rather than a weighing machine.
Analysis guru Benjamin Graham offered the following simple formula for valuing growth companies in his book The Intelligent Investor:
Benjamin Graham, the patriarch of value investing, wrote in his book "The Intelligent Investor," "The essence of investment management is the management of risks, not the management of returns."
Warren Buffett praised The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham, revised edition.
Instead, it was George "Jerry" Goodman, the man who has used this pseudonym for half a century to famously write on finance; his creation -- a phrase the humble Goodman eschews -- came in the form of a request by Benjamin Graham that Goodman go to Nebraska and ask Graham's former student if together they would update the legendary investment tome The Intelligent Investor.

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