Gilded Age

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Gilded Age

The period of American history from approximately the end of the Civil War to the early 20th century. The Gilded Age was marked by rapid industrialization, development of infrastructure (such as railroads), and virtually no government regulation of the economy. Important industrialists, such as Andrew Carnegie, John W. Rockefeller, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and others, led a period of development that created what became the modern American economy. This age saw the early development of organized labor, which the industrialists often violently opposed. Apologists for the Gilded Age point out that this era laid the foundations for American philanthropy and employed many people who might have gone without jobs otherwise. Critics denounce the era's alleged conspicuous consumption on the part of the wealthy and economic instability that they claim came from lack of regulation. See also: Panic of 1873, Panic of 1893, Panic of 1907, Cross of Gold, Robber baron.
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Gilded Age

The years between the Civil War and World War I when institutions undertook financial manipulations that went virtually unchecked by government. This era produced many infamous activities in the security markets.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nesbit was highly sought after as a model by the top brands of the day embodying the Gilded Age with the ascension of fashion photography and setting the standard for female beauty.
Astor Do?: The Essential Guide to the Manners and Mores of the Gilded Age" serves as a guide to manners as well as an insight to Mrs.
Brands's account of the Gilded Age, Leviathan: America Comes of Age, 1865-1900 (2007), was yanked at the last minute, too, without comment from Oxford--but not without suggestions that Brands was too complimentary to industrial capitalism.
Vanderbilts) during the Gilded Age creates depth and intrigue, engaging the reader and keeping the pages turning.
But people are starting to look at Facebook and Google and wonder how they are moretrustworthy or transparentthan Standard Oil or US Steel, the Gilded Age corporate behemoths.
Artistic Furniture of the Gilded Age: Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room
Building on well-known scholarship examining the same topic--most notably Gaines Foster's Moral Reconstruction: Christian Lobbyists and the Federal Legislation of Morality, 1865-1920--Gordon McKinney makes a compelling case that Blair's life and political career offer "important insights into the origins and application of political reform during the Gilded Age" (1).
I was teaching a class on the Gilded Age, a course that traces the decline of what the historian Robert Wiebe described as a nation of "island communities." In the decades after the Civil War, Americans found themselves increasingly connected--by railroads, by the telegraph, by new national markets and an explosion of print culture--in a world that seemed to be moving faster every year.
They remember in detail because they didn't just learn about railroads during the Gilded Age, they lived them.
of Western Ontario, Canada) presents a comparative exploration of the differing cultural and political perspectives demonstrated by editorial cartoonists in Canadian and US newspapers during the gilded age (from 1849 to the early 1900s).
"Set securely in the context of the culture of the Gilded Age, The Inventor and the Tycoon provides a beautifully written account of the collaboration of these two ambitious, contentious and ultimately incompatible men.
But because of Pearson's admirable aspiration to attach her history of anticruelty reform in the Gilded Age to the larger narrative of American legal liberalism, her superficial treatment of the Fourteenth Amendment and its complicated history is unfortunate.