Jobseeker's Allowance

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Jobseeker's Allowance

A welfare benefit in the United Kingdom for unemployed persons who are looking for a job. It is available to all unemployed persons of working age (the exact age depends on the minimum age for the state pension). In order to be eligible, one must present oneself to a job center every two weeks to prove one is looking for work. The Jobseeker's Allowance traces its origins to 1911.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'They need to get certification from the DOLE to prove they were retrenched because of involuntary termination like closure or cessation of operation,' Benavidez said.
The DOLE officer stressed the outputs of the profiling activities will serve as the basis for subsequent intervention to bring down the number of child laborers in the province.
The DOLE said most of the unemployed are entering the job market for the first time.
Produced in the Dole facility in Atwater, Calif., varieties include: Blueberries; Wild Blueberries; Raspberries; Mixed Berries; Marion Blackberries; Whole Strawberries; Pineapple Chunks; Mango Chunks; Tropical Island Blend (mixture of Tropical Gold Pineapple, mangos, peaches, strawberries and honeydew); Dark Sweet Cherries; Sliced Peaches; and Mixed Fruit (peaches, strawberries, pineapple, honeydew and red seedless grapes).
Countless comparisons of the two women were made, and of particular concern to the Dole campaign staff was for Dole to appear as a very traditional wife.
Like other members of the Dole community, they assumed that the spirit would exhibit physical chara cteristics and these would allow it to be tested on the corporeal plane, but that these terrestrial signs would have otherworldly significance.
The Dole campaign aired a spot saying the Forbes flat-tax plan would cost every New Hampshire household more than $2,000 a figure so bogus that the author of the one-page study on which it was based disavowed it.
(It is legal, however, to accept money from the American subsidiaries of multinational companies or from individuals who have their green cards and could eventually become citizens.) Nor was the Dole campaign blameless: A prominent Massachusetts business owner and fund raiser paid a $6 million fine because he improperly reimbursed employees who wrote checks to Dole.
Under the Dole proposal, a dishonest taxpayer would have an incentive to stonewall the IRS and escape paying his fair share.
The Dole campaign proceeded to smear Roy during the campaign's closing days.
Miller, vice president of the Center for Equal Opportunity; the Northwestern Review's Lynne Munson, recently Lynne Cheney's top staffer at the American Enterprise Institute and now in the policy office of the Dole campaign; the Princeton Sentinels Ruth Shalit, an associate editor for The New Republic, and the University of Iowa's Campus Review columnist David Mastio, now an editorial writer and op-ed page editor at USA Today.
Let's examine the Dole military myth piece by piece: