testament

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Related to Testaments: New Testaments

testament

Originally, an instrument that provided for the disposition of personal property after death.Today,it is simply another word for a will,as in “last will and testament.”

References in periodicals archive ?
It is a matter of significance that up to 1599 no vernacular edition of the Bible with Old and New Testaments published on the European continent omitted the Apocrypha.
Cornelia Soldat, Das Testament Ivans des Schrecklichen von 1572: Eine kritische Aufklarung/A Textual Analysis of the 1572 Will of Ivan the Terrible.
In academic and dialogical circles there was a marked increase of using "The Hebrew Bible" instead of "The Old Testament.
According to the story, a Third Testament has been added to both the Old Testament and the New Testament.
In the end, while the author's efforts to find a way to reunite the Old and New Testaments will no doubt be welcomed by some in theological circles, the author's path to this end must be questioned.
Here you will learn something about the history of the text of the Old and New Testaments, and about the evolution of the sex laws from Deuteronomy to Leviticus to the New Testament and into later Christian thought.
Wright published An Eye for An Eye: The Place of Old Testament Ethics Today in 1983.
The same can't remotely be said of the New Testament, and it was the resulting Christian rejection of the literal written word of the New Testament (in other words, the Reformation's failure) that ultimately turned the Reformation into the liberalizing "success" of popular history.
Accordingly, the notion of the Christian church as a community of the new covenant links up with this and binds the two Testaments together.
For Boys, reinterpretation begins with abandoning literalistic Scripture readings, where the "Old" Testament and Judaism serve merely as backdrop to the story of Christ and to Christianity as a newer, more authentic faith.
John Foxe, the martyologist, and John Day, the Elizabethan master printer, played central roles in the emergence of literate print culture following the death of William Tyndale, translator of the New Testament and parts of the Bible into English.
While the utility of such a large collection is not in doubt--the texts not directly relevant give a perspective on the Old Testament world--the titles, of the book are misleading.