Terminal Year

(redirected from Terminal Years)

Terminal Year

The year in which a person dies. Special tax rules apply during a person's terminal year.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in marketing the Brooklyn Army Terminal years ago for the NYC Public Development Corporation (now EDC), it was enough to place stories in top tier publications and real estate trades about the City's makeover of the property, host events for brokers and business owners, and send packages of materials to journalists and potential tenants.
When "The Americans," FX's period drama about a married pair of KGB spies working under deep cover outside Washington, D.C., during the terminal years of the Soviet Union, premiered in 2013, it had all the hallmarks of a typical Golden Age show.
For the past four BOT projects, corporate guarantees were extended only for major maintenance expenditure in the terminal years, for shortfall in termination payments, and, in some cases, for partial debt servicing.
The Huaca Colorada excavations, he added, should provide "quite a lot of information on the way of life of the Moche in their terminal years," said Moche expert Luis Jaime Castillo Butters.
From estimates of: (1) Mean E for last 12 months of life; (2) overall mean calendar year E for all subjects (those who did and did not die during that year); (3) mean portion of the sample dying annually; and (4) the variances (and covariances) of these estimates, we obtained point estimates and confidence limits for: (a) Total (annual) expenses directed to terminal and nonterminal years; (b) mean annual E for nonterminal years; (c) percent of all expenditures spent for terminal years; and (d) ratio (mean expenses during terminal year/mean annual expenses during nonterminal years).
The amounts, broken down by payer and service category, include: expenditures for terminal years of life (column 2), for nonterminal years of life (column 3); percent of total expenditures spent on terminal years (column 4), and the expenditure ratio (mean terminal year of life/mean annual nonterminal year of life) (column 5).
Of the estimated $282 billion total annual medical expenses for persons 65 and older, 22 percent (95 percent CI: 20-24 percent) were spent during terminal years of life.
This increase in terminal year non-Medicare expenditures with older age at death was largely from greater long-term care facility expenditures for older decedents.
We, therefore, study 1992-1996 Medicare and non-Medicare expenditures during the last 12 months of life (referred to as "terminal year expenditures") as compared to expenditures before the last 12 months of life (referred to as "nonterminal year expenditures") using data from the Medicare Beneficiary Survey (MCBS).
We define terminal year expenditures as those for persons who died 12 or fewer months after the expense date and nonterminal year expenditures as all other expenses.
From the coefficient estimates, their covariances, and Cramer's theorem (Lehman 1997), point estimates with 95 percent confidence limits for portions of terminal year expenses occurring in the last m = 1, 3, and 6 months of life were obtained.
The framework projects that tax revenues would increase from 15 percent in 1996-97 to 16 percent in the terminal years. The fiscal deficit would be reduced from 4 percent to 3 percent of GDP and the bank borrowing would be reduced to almost half of the present rate.