tenure

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tenure

A time period,as in the tenure of a lease.

References in periodicals archive ?
In a recent clarification sent to Vice Chancellors (VCs)/ Rectors of public sector universities across the country, the HEC further directed the institutes not to count the period of such faculty members (serving on administrative posts) towards their tenure track service and further clarified such individuals are not eligible to draw Tenure Track System (TTS) salaries.
HOW THE UNIVERSITY BREAKS DOWN[br][br]THE CONTRACT NONRENEWAL NUMBERS The College of Arts and Sciences employs a total of 881 faculty members: 455 tenure track faculty (TTF), 259 non-tenure track faculty (NTTF), 138 visiting/adjunct faculty and 29 retired faculty.
Adapting the concept of madrinas (godmothers), senior REAL members provided mentorship and guidance to junior Latina faculty who were navigating the tenure track (Nunez, & Murakami-Ramalho, 2011).
She recruited more than 20 percent of the current tenure track faculty and implemented a new tenure track faculty appointment program.
A case study using qualitative content analysis was conducted on the transitioning experiences of three assistant professors of nursing, who had young children, during their first two years on tenure track at a research-intensive public university.
Years ago, Grisby turned down a tenure track job at Yale in favor of a nontenure track appointment.
For example, Schools of Business and Management had committed more resources to hiring a larger number of tenured or tenure track faculty.
While more may be added, the fact that there are fewer postings now than at the low-point in 2009-10 following the economic downturn (and endowment death spirals) is a quick indicator that underhiring to the tenure track is becoming normalized.
Since interlibrary loan requests and other extra steps of this kind can delay the progress of your research, you need to know that you cannot afford to lose any time during your first years on the tenure track before beginning your work on long-term projects like the book.
Institutional budget constraints have expedited long-term declines in the number of full-time, tenure track faculty positions available in many academic disciplines, especially the humanities.