Telecommunications Act of 1996

(redirected from Telecommunications Act)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Telecommunications Act of 1996

Legislation in the United States that deregulated telecommunications. It changed regulations for telephones, television broadcasts and cable in order to reduce barriers to entry and increase competition. It also regulated explicit material broadcast on television. See also: Communications Decency Act.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
At present, schedule 3A of the Telecommunications Act only applies to submarine cables that nexus Australia to an overseas location, not domestic cables, further proposed alterations would also domestic submarine cable operators to land cables in existing cable protection zones.
Under the Telecommunications Act 1984 mast owners have considerable powers to remain on your land.
She discussed some of the rural issues that might be addressed by the rewrite of the 1996 Telecommunications Act.
The brief from the local government groups argues that cable modem service is a "cable service" within the meaning of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, and that the FCC was wrong in concluding otherwise in its March 2002 Declaratory Ruling.
Without the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the financial resources to deploy this new technology as a true alternative would not be available.
When the Telecommunications Act of 1996 was passed, one of its benefits was to open up opportunities for smaller businesses like Telecon to compete in areas once dominated by large conglomerates.
While the Telecommunications Act was a victory for American consumers, it is only a start.
That notion was quickly dispelled with AT&T's divestiture, and now with the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
But the FCC said that in general, such utilities are a part of the state itself and, therefore, don't fall under provisions in section 253 of the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, barring states from preventing an entity from entering a telecommunications service market.
Low local rates are made possible only by a complex web of federal and state subsidies, which are coming under attack as the Telecommunications Act opens up the telephone market to competition.
In a significant win for cities around the country, the Federal District Court in Detroit took a giant step toward upholding the intent of the Federal Telecommunications Act of 1996 by protecting the ability of cities and towns to manage the public rights-of-way and charge compensation for their use.
said he intended for the new TV ratings provision of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 to give parents a programming guide that is detailed and descriptive as to language, sex and violence, and enables parents to make judgments about blocking shows on an individual basis.

Full browser ?