Telecommunications Act of 1996

(redirected from Telecom Act of 1996)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Telecommunications Act of 1996

Legislation in the United States that deregulated telecommunications. It changed regulations for telephones, television broadcasts and cable in order to reduce barriers to entry and increase competition. It also regulated explicit material broadcast on television. See also: Communications Decency Act.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(g) The Telecom Act of 1996 will essentially become impotent, along with any real chance for non-Bell competitors to survive in Bell markets.
It is the first major telecom legislation since the Telecom Act of 1996.
In 1998, Tech Law Journal wrote about the Blumenthal suit: "Section 230 of the massive Telecom Act of 1996 protects interactive computer services from lawsuits based on defamation by information content providers.
In so doing, the Telecom Act of 1996 created an environment that fostered technological innovation and economic growth and established a foundation for the broadband ecosystem that is thriving today.
DEATRICK: The state of Minnesota's contention was that Vonage looked like a phone service and acted like a phone service and therefore was a telecommunications company as defined by the Title 2 of the Telecom Act of 1996. So, the state ordered Vonage to go get a competitive local exchange carrier (CLEC) certificate, and start paying all the taxes and fulfilling the obligations that come with a CLEC certificate.
Del Monte Dunes, recent developments in land use, planning and zoning law, facility issues under the Telecom Act of 1996, historic preservation and architectural control law, exactions law in 1998, land use and religion, ethics and land use planning, urban sprawl issues, research and evolving objectives of law use law.
More changes will need to occur to fulfill the growth and market expansion everyone expected with the passage of the Telecom Act of 1996.
When Congress passed the Telecom Act of 1996, it deregulated the broadcasting industry.
Similarly, members of Congress may not poke sticks into the eyes of their local TV broadcasters out of fear that they, too, would be eaten alive." (10) Similarly: During my interviews regarding the Telecom Act of 1996, when I would hear somebody make the Allegation, I would ask: "do you have any hard evidence?" In response, the interviewee would often look at me as though I were an idiot (some even expressed open contempt) because the question revealed to them that I understood nothing about politics or human life.
"It's been almost three years since enactment of the Telecom Act of 1996, and we still haven't seen the support promised by Congress for rural America," said Mark Roellig, executive vice president, Public Policy, Human Resources and Law, U S WEST.
Of special note is Goldstein's analysis revealing that the dysfunctional elements that would lead to the boom-bust cycle crash of the telecommunications industry began long before the Telecom Act of 1996 (itself a belated, overly compromised reaction to an obsolete regulatory model).