scientific management

(redirected from Taylorisation)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

scientific management

an approach to JOB DESIGN advocated by F. W. Taylor (1856-1915), an American WORK STUDY engineer. Taylor sought to increase output by improving management competence and by careful attention to job design. Specifically, he advocated close analysis of job tasks through the methods of work study as a basis for achieving an extreme degree of job specialization. All decisionmaking about task performance was to pass to management, who were to create ‘thinking departments’ to analyse and plan work tasks. Supervision of performance was to be undertaken by ‘functional foremen’, responsible for particular aspects of the production process (for example maintenance). Workers would be motivated by pay incentives to work to the full extent of their abilities, and the best workers should be selected for each particular job. Taylor believed that adoption of his system would lead to high levels of efficiency In reality his theory ignored the importance of JOB SATISFACTION. Adoption of his methods led to STRIKES and CONFLICT. See FORDISM, METHOD STUDY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Internationalization of curricula: An alternative to the Taylorisation of academic work.
There is a widespread opposition to privatising policies and to the deskilling of labour that accompanies the Taylorisation of newly marketised spheres like health or child-care.
Hence most of the literature on call centres examines the Taylorisation of work within a context of high levels of control and standardisation.
Internationalisation of curricula: An alternative to the Taylorisation of academic work.
It has become the victim of Taylorisation, Fordism, managerialism, and globalisation, and it has been reduced to routinized, technocratic and bureaucratic tasks where evidence and competency-based practice and risk assessments are the order of the day irrespective of whether or not they improve the lot of clients.
Taylor and Bain (1999) contend that the call centre labour process is taking the Taylorisation of white-collar work to the extreme, suggesting that the use of rigid scripts together with remote monitoring of operators' calls represents an unprecedented level of labour control.
The whole impulse towards speeding up and rationalisation of processes to create greater efficiency and throughput within organisations, is now often called Taylorisation.