Taxpayer

(redirected from Taxpayers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Taxpayer

A person who pays taxes. In the United States, nearly everyone is a taxpayer at some level because almost everyone pays FICA taxes, sales taxes and other taxes. Colloquially, however, the word refers to persons who pay income and capital gains taxes. The word is sometimes used in a political context to make both conservative and liberal arguments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, most taxpayers who miss the election filing deadline will probably keep trading securities before they discover the MTM election is available; thus, their losses or gains may increase or decrease before they file their elections.
Under current law, taxpayers can exclude from income the first $250,000, or $500,000 in the case of joint filers, of gain on the sale or disposition of a personal residence.
The shrinkback rule offers additional opportunities for taxpayers to qualify more of their receipts as DPGR.
An Offer in Compromise is an agreement between a taxpayer and the IRS that resolves the taxpayer's liability.
Limiting the number of taxpayers affected by the alternative minimum tax;
Clearly, the short time limits do not allow taxpayers to use the CAP simply to delay pertinent collection activity, as the potential delay will only be two to three weeks, at most.
The Notice imposes a consistency rule under which taxpayers who take the position that they MPGE QPP for the taxable year also must treat themselves as producing that property for purposes of the uniform capitalization rules of section 263A.
This is called exchange last because the exchange of the properties, with respect to exchanging taxpayers, occurs at the last step.
FSA 200147053 reflects the IRS' concern about whether taxpayers purchase replacement property with an intent to replace.
Thus, taxpayers requesting to change to a different LIFO pooling method should be prepared to deal with these subjective rules while Form 3115 is being processed.
263(a)-4(c) requires taxpayers to capitalize costs incurred in connection with the acquisition of a laundry list of intangibles, including, for example, an ownership interest in a corporation, partnership, or LLC; a variety of financial interests and products; insurance and annuity contracts; leases; patents and copyrights; as well as both "customer-based" and "supplier-based" intangibles.
The proposed revenue procedure allows certain taxpayers with annual average gross receipts (over the three prior taxable years) of not more than $10 million to convert to the cash accounting method.