Government Spending

(redirected from Tax expenditures)

Government Spending

The payment of money by a government for some service it offers. A major example of government spending is payment of salaries for military personnel. Because government spending is financed by some combination of taxes and public debt, the level and recipients of government spending are usually matters of some controversy.
References in periodicals archive ?
An assumption of our paper is that tax expenditures and direct
The adjustment on the expenditure side should rely on more permanent and better targeted measures, such as parametric reform to the pension system, shifts to means-testing of social assistance programs and reductions in subsidies and tax expenditures.
Some members of Congress may try to cut so-called tax expenditures as a way to soften the impact the tax cuts would have on the deficit.
today introduced the Tax Expenditures Accountability Act, marking the launch of his campaign to take on the special interests lobbying against tax reform in order to protect their taxpayer-funded loopholes.
It is useful to distinguish between tax rules that represent tax expenditures relative to a pure income tax from rules that represent tax expenditures relative to a consumption tax.
These automatic appropriations included retirement and life insurance premium, internal revenue allotment for local government units, pensions of former presidents as well as ex-presidents' widows, special account in the general fund (including motor vehicle users charge fund), net lending, interest payments, and releases under the tax expenditures fund for customs duties and taxes to be paid for government importation.
Tax Expenditures in Billions of Dollars Fiscal Year 2014 Individual Tax $1,036 Expenditures 87% Corporate Tax $148 Expenditures 13% Source: Office of Management and Budget Note: Table made from pie chart.
Doing the same for the 37 tax expenditures in fiscal year 2015/16 would have revealed personal income taxes $5.
Conventional wisdom holds that tax expenditures are supposed to change taxpayer behavior, and therefore work best when they target taxpayers at the margin of performing some behavior or not.
The author covers tax reform, both in theory and in practice, the history of the federal income tax, tax expenditures, tax expenditures and economic behavior, expenditures for human resources and income support, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
Funds subsidized by such tax expenditures can themselves be the objects of fraud.