Tariff Barrier

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Tariff Barrier

A tariff designed to make imports more expensive than domestically produced products. That is, a tariff barrier is a tax imposed upon imports to protect local industries and companies. Critics, notably the WTO, have criticized tariff barriers because they believe they discourage international trade and because they may have net negative effects on the economy in the long run. However, proponents of tariff barriers argue that they can force countries to develop their own domestic industries. See also: Import substitution industrialization, Free trade.
References in periodicals archive ?
move, the Chinese government has said it plans to put up a tariff wall on $94 million worth of U.
The weight of this argument is compounded by the fact that a small number of agribusiness companies in Japan have made super-profits protected behind the Japanese tariff wall and subsidy system.
Thus the farmer must meet the competition of the world, while our friends, the manufacturers, are protected by a strong tariff wall, which enables them to make their own prices.
Australian manufacturers exported products worth more than $2 billion to China last year despite that country s high tariff walls.
He noted that instead of hiding behind high tariff walls the agriculture sector needed to focus on improving its competitiveness.
someone who believes that nation states can best survive in a wider trading group that has a common identity forged by strong tariff walls.
In response to the collapse of demand in 1929, it erected high tariff walls.
So in a post-Doha world, these countries could protect their leaf (and associated manufacturing) industries with higher tariff walls, while having often free access to overseas markets--global tobacco companies will doubtless take note.
Hafeez Pasha said the report prepared by MHDC suggests that the export encourages South Asian countries to protect their local industries behind tariff walls, thereby narrowing the scope for intra-regional exports.
High on the list of USTR demands will be a reduction in Chinese tariffs - which now average approximately 23 percent, about 50 percent higher than most developing countries - especially in the sectors China hopes to protect behind high tariff walls.
While other countries were surrounded by tariff walls, military rule, and protectionist measures in the 1980s, then-dictator Augusto Pinochet limited the role of the state, encouraged the private sector and private savings to develop, and opened financial markets to foreign trade.
He is an arch-capitalist, who wants a free market in Europe, surrounded by tariff walls to keep out cheap imports.