Target firm


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Related to Target firm: Friendly Acquisition, Takeover Bids

Target firm

A firm that is the object of a takeover by another firm.

Takeover Target

A publicly-traded company that is the object of a takeover, especially, but not necessarily, a hostile takeover. That is, another company is interested in buying the takeover target, often by buying its shares with the intent of obtaining a majority stake without the authorization of its board of directors. An acquiring company identifies takeover targets based on a variety of factors, including share price and growth potential; it may buy up to 5% of the takeover target without publicly disclosing its intentions. A takeover target is also called a target company.
References in periodicals archive ?
1] Economic gains from disciplinary acquisitions will be high when target firms have agency problems, and their managerial performance is expected to decline in the future if they were to operate as independent firms.
For example, the SDC creates an entry in the ODA field when a target firm publicizes its intention to sell itself or when a target firm receives an unsolicited offer from a bidder.
Claims often arise from acquired high-risk clients of target firms where the risk was not properly identified and managed.
Five factors hypothesized to affect target firm member trust after a takeover were found to be significant influences on employees' trust judgments in a decision-making simulation: (i) combining firms' collaboration history, (ii) mode of takeover, (iii) whether it was a domestic or cross-border acquisition, (iv) degree of autonomy removal, and (v) attractiveness of the acquiring firm's human resource policies and reward system.
Similarly, our results suggest that as acquiring firms get relatively more profitable, the emphasis placed on salary declines and the emphasis placed on bonuses increases relative to target firms (significant at [alpha] < 0.
Moreover, successful acquirers do not judge target firms based solely on financial criteria such as return on investment or expected impact on earnings per share.
Table 2 Univariate Analysis of Measures of Incremental Wealth and Acquisition Premiums Mean Values Full Sample Overfunded (N = 150) (N = 73) Premium Accepted by Target Firm $ Premium 12.
jt~ represents returns earned by the target firm after adjusting for the "normal" return process.
Cross-holders in such instances enjoyed a modest net gain of 1 percent, but clearly their assets in the target firm had mitigated against what could have been a significant loss.
A change of control can mitigate the agency problems in the target firm if the acquiror can implement better business practices and eliminate self dealing and other costly forms of "managerial" behavior.
To avoid this, the acquiring firm may choose to have the target firm terminate its plan prior to merger or acquisition.