Target Risk

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Target Risk

1. A term for prospective policyholders of an insurance company, organized by demographic information such as age and gender.

2. The amount of risk an investor is willing to take. Target risk varies according to the investor's risk tolerance.
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Following vigorous work, the targets were identified and a security plan was put in place to target risks and threats to the homeland on the security map.
A move by central banks to a long-term 4 per cent inflation target risks triggering the same dynamic.
This represents an enormous shift in policy, away from treating to target goals to target risks," says Steven Nissen, MD, chairman of the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic.
But the wrong kind of target risks pushing the UK down a route that needlessly drives up electricity prices for households and businesses.
2011) we suggested that further development of the SNCD concept could involve the use of alternative target risks (e.
The credibility of the MPC's commitment to keeping inflation on target risks being eroded it if continues to run at a relatively high level," Sentance wrote.
Given the massive changes needed in design, materials and construction methods, a 2011 target risks setting up Wales to fail.
Although target risks for the terroism coverage are broader than the firm's typical business, several classes of businesses are specifically excluded: transport, military, abortion clinics, bridges and tunnels, judicial, government, and religious.
Its mandate covers the entire food supply chain, ranging from animal health issues on the farm to the product that arrives on the consumer's table, thus significantly enhancing its ability to target risks to health wherever they arise in the production of our food," he said.
The syndicate's business benefits from the Euclidian's broker operation, Euclidian Insurance Services, in its ability to target risks at the distribution level.
However, alternative target risks and low-dose extrapolation models also may be considered under the SNCD approach.