Taliban


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Taliban

A political movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001. When it was in power, the Taliban was noted for brutal treatment of women and for almost entirely wiping out the cultivation of opium, which was until then one of Afghanistan's primary cash crops. It based its teachings and rule on an austere interpretation of Islam combined with Pashto tribal law. In 2001, it was overthrown by the United States and coalition forces. Since 2004, the Taliban has become a major insurgent group in Afghanistan, funded through opium trade.
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But while traveling to Kabul, Mattis told reporters there were signs elements of the Taliban were interested in negotiations.
The US administration, however, seems to be divided in their response to the Taliban peace overtures.
The timing of the Taliban overture was profoundly significant.
A spokesperson for Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said while the government had encouraged the Taliban to talk, the attacks in
The Taliban said the attacks were a message to Trump that his policy of aggression would not work.
During its formation in the early 1990s, the Taliban successfully transcended tribal and cultural norms, representing a strict form of Sunni Islam based on Deobandi doctrine, a dogmatic form of Islam originating in northern India that reinforces a conservative Islamic ethical code.
In 2010 the Obama administration poured more American soldiers in Afghanistan, taking the surge to one hundred thousand in a bid to stop the Taliban making headway.
In 1998, a small Taliban unit entered the Iranian consulate in Mazari Sharif, Afghanistan's third largest city, and rounded up and butchered nine Iranian diplomats.
The Taliban claimed the death was a retribution for the recent assassination of one of its leaders.
In an audio posted on the Taliban website, he also expressed condolences to the Taliban Rabari Shura or leadership council over the death of Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansour.
A local elder Jehanzeb Burki says that the Gulzar-e-Hijri was a perfect house for the Taliban leader because despite being a mix neighborhood it was not a strange place for the people wearing same outfits as that of the person believed to be Taliban leader.
As there was no progress on any of these demands, it was felt that the Taliban may not join the peace process being brokered by the Quadrilateral Coordination Group (QCG) with representatives from Afghanistan, Pakistan, China and the US.