Takes price

Takes price

Requiring some price movement or concession on behalf of the initiating party before a trade can be consummated. See: Price give.

Takes Price

A price that one party must raise (for a buyer) or lower (for a seller) for a counterparty to be willing to accept the offer. See also: Market price.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 1925, John Lewis has operated with its "Never knowingly undersold" philosophy, which takes price concerns out of the equation.
This takes price growth for the first six months of the year to 3.
She takes price in fervently defending her clients by focusing on their particular needs.
But what made this evening that extra touch special was that it felt like the beginning of a journey which we hope takes Price all the way to world title glory.
I was chatting to the barmaid in my local and she said her boyfriend takes price tags off cheap steaks in the supermarket and puts them on expensive ones to get prime cuts for a bargain fee.
We already know that to be the leader in consumer software publishing takes more than a low price point," continued Currier, "It takes price, service and quality.
The value of sales - which takes prices into account - fell 0.
That takes prices back to the levels of last October when they last touched the pounds 1 mark.
Available to order now at an extra cost of pounds 1,450, the transmission takes prices for the first ever two-pedal S3 models to pounds 28,920 for the three-door and pounds 29,420 for the five-door Sportback.
The Sport version takes prices up to more than pounds 12,000 in the case of the automatic models, which are in great demand as star used car buys.
SNP transport spokesman Kenny MacAskill said: ``This is very unhelpful and takes prices close to the same levels that provoked the protests.