Taft-Hartley Act

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Taft-Hartley Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 1947, that amended and rolled back some of the provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. Specifically, the Act provided a list of "unfair labor practices" in which unions and other forms of organized labor could not engage. It prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wherein workers protest transfers to another division or role within the same company, and wildcat strikes, or strikes unauthorized by a union. It also forbade solidarity or other political strikes, and disallowed unions from donating to federal political campaigns. Importantly, the Taft-Hartley Act allowed individual states to pass right-to-work laws. See also: Featherbedding, National Labor Relations Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps no piece of legislation is more closely associated with Taft, and has had more lasting influence in the country, than the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947. This law outlawed the practice of the "closed shop," where workers must belong to the union as a condition of employment, by allowing states to become "Right to Work" states, where each individual worker in a "union shop" has the freedom to choose whether or not to join the union.
The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned the closed shop but left it to the state's discretion whether to also prohibit the union shop and agency shop.
The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 had rolled back union protections; the subsequent decline, in numbers and power, of labor unions would change the course of liberalism, as its strongest force for economic populism lost political influence both within the movement and in the wider world.
Channeling Calvin Coolidge, he told them there was no right to strike against the public safety, and he ordered them back to work under the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947. When only 10 percent of the striking controllers complied, Reagan gave the remainder 48 hours to return to work.
The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 was a milestone in that anti-union battle.
The right-to-work provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 have created sort of a natural experiment, providing an opportunity to observe behavior in two types of environments: one where workers are not compelled to join labor unions and a second where they can be compelled to join as a condition of employment.