Taft-Hartley Act


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Taft-Hartley Act

Legislation in the United States, enacted in 1947, that amended and rolled back some of the provisions of the National Labor Relations Act. Specifically, the Act provided a list of "unfair labor practices" in which unions and other forms of organized labor could not engage. It prohibited jurisdictional strikes, wherein workers protest transfers to another division or role within the same company, and wildcat strikes, or strikes unauthorized by a union. It also forbade solidarity or other political strikes, and disallowed unions from donating to federal political campaigns. Importantly, the Taft-Hartley Act allowed individual states to pass right-to-work laws. See also: Featherbedding, National Labor Relations Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our goal in this research was to create an empirical model of free riding and to find direct evidence of the effects of Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act are open to dispute because they ignore other variables that may affect an individual's decision to free ride.
The controversial Taft-Hartley Act was passed over Pres.
The American Federation of Labor's top leaders, most of whom had not been comfortable with reliance on the state to stabilize incomes and to encourage the growth of collective bargaining, were enthusiastic about the Taft-Hartley Act, which undercut the influence of the CIO, including its Keynesian, social democratic political and social activism.
First came the 1947 Taft-Hartley Act, which outlawed the mass strikes that labor leaders like John L.
In 1947, the Taft-Hartley Act made benefits part of the collective bargaining process.
Bush invoked the rarely used Taft-Hartley Act to reopen the ports.
Truman's veto of the Taft-Hartley Act, designed to limit the power of organized labor.
Bush invoked the Taft-Hartley Act, significantly impacted the global supply chain and cost the economy between $500 million and $2 billion a day.
supply chains, government lobbyists and officials both have asked President Barack Obama to employ his authority under the Taft-Hartley Act to order a so-called cooling-off period of 80 days should the current dispute escalate to the point where either a lockout by management or a strike by labor appears imminent.
He speaks in particular about the barriers thrown up by the passage of the Taft-Hartley Act in 1947 and the Landrum-Griffin Act in 1959, both of which ushered in new institutional constraints for unionists.
In response, Congress passed the Taft-Hartley Act, named after its two sponsors, Senator Robert Taft of Ohio and Representative Fred A.
Taft, as chairman of the Senate Labor Committee, wrote a new national labor relations law, the Taft-Hartley Act. When Truman vetoed it, Taft persuaded both House and Senate to override the veto.