Tael


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Tael

A unit of weight in Taiwan approximately equivalent to 37.5 grams. It is used primarily in the sale of bulk foodstuffs. An equivalent term is niu.
References in periodicals archive ?
To cool down the local surging gold demand, the SBV allowed the Saigon Jewelry Company (SJC), who is entrusted by the SBV as the sole gold bar processor in Vietnam, to process 350,000 taels of Gold, equivalent to 13 tons, to fill in the local shortage of Gold supply.
Also, in Erelt, Kasik, Metslang, Rajandi, Ross, Saari, Tael, Vare 1993 : 145 is mentioned wholeness in connection with elative NPs.
Most Finnish -AhtA momentatives, for instance, are descriptive and Estonian -ata momentatives typically express onomatopoetic sounds of nature (Hakulinen, Vilkuna, Korhonen, Koivisto, Heinonen, Alho 2004 : 308; Erelt, Kasik, Metslang, Rajandi, Ross, Saari, Tael, Vare 1995 : 453-454).
According to certain phonological modifications grade alternation can be classified on the basis of its direction (strengthening/weakening), and type (quantity, length and quality alternation) (Erelt, Kasik, Metslang, Rajandi, Ross, Saari, Tael, Vare 1995 : 144-145; Erelt, Erelt, Ross 1997 : 173-174).
piastres = 72-5 francs; I assume '1 bar of silver' equalled a 1-ounce tael (see Havard, APF, V [1830]: 345).
Carletti quotes a price of 90 tael per picul, while Jan Huig van Linschoten indicates 140-145 Pesos de a ocho (approximately 100 tael) per picul for medium-quality and 150 to 170 Pesos for high-quality spun raw silk.
Other descriptions, such as EKG I (Erelt, Kasik, Metslang, Rajandi, Ross, Saari, Tael, Vare 1995), Viks 1992 and OS (Eesti keele sonaraamat OS 2006), arrive at a slightly different breakdown of classes and subtypes.
5) For example, EKK (2000 : 277) propose four basic classes, EKG I (Erelt, Kasik, Metslang, Rajandi, Ross, Saari, Tael, Vare 1995 : 344ff.
Erelt 1989; Erelt, Kasik, Metslang, Rajandi, Ross, Saari, Tael, Vare 1993 (= EKG II)).
In EKG I (Erelt, Kasik, Metslang, Rajandi, Ross, Saari, Tael, Vare 1995 : 51) is stressed that the use of directional cases with verbs like unustama 'to forget', jatma 'to leave' is a feature that distinguishes Estonian from Indo-European languages.