SWIFT

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Related to Swiftian: Jonathan Swift

SWIFT

Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications

A cooperative society that provides highly secure message communications between banks. It does not transfer money or any other financial materials, but simply provides information. It also standardizes forms between members so as to reduce costs and operational risk. Founded in 1973 and headquartered in Belgium, SWIFT has thousands of members in more than 200 countries worldwide.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the attempts to reproduce Swiftian satire do not reproduce the instability of Swiftian irony, then they fail to do what they ostensibly set out to do.
Bond supposedly satirized Pope but, we hear in Swiftian interrogatives, "where is such a Satire to be found?
It must already be apparent how closely the word's development is bound up with Swiftian usage.
By first creating a strikingly Swiftian persona, a "Modest Proposer" blind to the inhumanity and "wrong reason" of his proposal, Trollope satirizes the folly of the "Fixed Period" and the fanaticism of its originator.
Is the novel a Swiftian satire ("A Modest Proposal" comes to mind) on the contemporary state of moral decay and spiritual pretense?
Other than the pleasure derived from their horseplay, what are the consequences of Komar & Melamid's Swiftian modest proposal that art can be made Hollywood-style from the decision-making processes of focus groups and exit polls?
Ali G can get away with forays into equally dangerous territory, because he's fleet of foot and comical of mouth, but no amount of Swiftian pretension could disguise the fact that, beneath Brass Eye's desperate desire to shock, lay a programme that was targetless and relentlessly unamusing.
must imagine is a Swiftian mode--while noting, bizarrely, that he likes
He pretends with malign Swiftian playfulness that Whigs and Tories have united in agreeing that abolishing Christianity would yield many advantages: for example, by repealing the Sabbath, Britain would no longer incur the grievous loss of one-seventh of its trade, business, and pleasure.
In general, leftwing prose writers in the Britain of the 1930s evinced a formally experimental brio which drew upon European surrealism and the work of Franz Kafka, as well as (more heavily) upon a more indigenous tradition of Swiftian satire.
Cossinus, that exemplary Swiftian hero, who having seen too much is undone, scorched by the sight of Celia's horrid fact.
Thus, "Testimony of an Indian Vulture" is, you might say, a "Dalit" story in spirit, written by a non-Dalit in an oblique, Swiftian manner, with far greater artistic finesse (if I may presumptuously add) than Dalit writers have been able to muster.