Sweatshop

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Sweatshop

A factory or other workplace where persons work for unusually low pay. The word connotes places where labor laws are consistently violated. For example, sweatshops may pay below minimum wage and hire underage persons. Alternatively, sweatshops may be legally set up in countries that have very few labor laws, but many still consider them unethical or immoral.
References in periodicals archive ?
President Obama and others who favor labor standards in trade agreements with foreign countries mean well, for they intend to tight back at oppressive sweatshops abroad.
In response to an ultimately failed proposal by then-senator Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) to ban imports from countries where children work in sweatshops, Bangladeshi firms laid off 50,000 children, many of whom ended up in worse jobs or on the street.
Sweatshops in Nineteenth-Century Great Britain and the United States
I can only hope the embers of that burned electronics sweatshop will spark a firestorm of outrage and a real movement for workers and human rights in this country.
The Sweatshop Free Warwick Uni campaign aims to encourage the university to sign up to the Workers' Rights Consortium (WRC) to ensure that all of its clothing is made under safe and fair conditions.
The NLC had identified four Guatemalan firms as sweatshops between 2006 and 2009.
Where anti sweatshop NGOS face profound financial fragility, and where the power and resources of the retailers, their supply chains, and their political allies seem almost unlimited, the CCC has tried to engage retailers to cooperate with corporate social responsibility.
brutal: A cop beats a young sweatshop worker in Dhaka
Slaves to Fashion: Poverty and Abuse in the New Sweatshops.
In early June, he was trying convince us that few things would help African development more than low-wage sweatshops.
Kevin and Renice Ward created Justify That in March of this year in response to the plight of cotton farmers and workers in sweatshops.
Using a wide range of sources, Hapke conveys the ways that Americans have condoned, sentimentalized, rejected, and protested sweatshops.