Sweatshop


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Sweatshop

A factory or other workplace where persons work for unusually low pay. The word connotes places where labor laws are consistently violated. For example, sweatshops may pay below minimum wage and hire underage persons. Alternatively, sweatshops may be legally set up in countries that have very few labor laws, but many still consider them unethical or immoral.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, Sweatshop is housed in a 15,000-square-foot facility that contains four dance studios and a dance apparel boutique.
For instance, in 2003 American activists helped in forcing BJ&B, a Dominican Republic sweatshop, to recognize a union, which rapidly obtained dramatically better conditions for its members.
Another advantage of the hot yoga at Sweatshop is that anyone, including beginners, can try it out.
By midway through the twentieth century, anything that could be meaningfully labeled a sweatshop for textile or apparel production ceased to operate on any widespread basis.
Now the new sweatshops appear to be electronics assembly shops.
To support the Sweatshop Free Warwick Uni Campaign go to www.
On the theoretical level, scholars have questioned whether the background conditions necessary for textbook economics to work are present in sweatshop labor markets, and they have attempted to identify economic mechanisms that may not make the sweatshop labor demand curve downward sloping (Arnold and Bowie, 2003, 2007; Arnold and Hartman, 2005, 2006; Arnold, 2010; Miller, 2003; Pollin et al.
The CCC, like the global anti sweatshop movement generally, was also built on new identities, particularly among Northern youth who intuited new forms of global citizenship.
Flesh & Blood So Cheap: The Triangle Fire and Its Legacy provides over 160 pages of information focusing on the destruction of a sweatshop in 1911, and is a fine pick for grades 4-6 studying American history and social issues.
The report focuses on the Junxingye sweatshop factory in southern China, which employs mostly young women paid 26.
NO COLLEGE PRESIDENT IN HIS right mind would want apparel bearing his school's logo made in a sweatshop.
Robert Ross's Slaves to Fashion tells the story of the transformation from an America that had for all practical purposes banished the sweatshop to history books to one where hundreds of thousands labor under sweatshop conditions both abroad and at home.