I

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I

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that it is the third preferred bond of the company.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

I

1. On a stock transaction table, a symbol indicating that a dividend was paid after a stock split.

2. A symbol appearing next to a bond listed on NASDAQ indicating that the bond is a company's third preferred bond. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if the letter "I" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is a third preferred bond.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

i

Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables to indicate that the dividend was paid after a stock dividend or split: Lehigh s.20i.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
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Henrich, "Surgical site infection in cesarean sections with the use of a plastic sheath wound retractor compared to the traditional self-retaining metal retractor," European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, vol.
A 48-HOUR COURSE of postoperative cephalexin and metronidazole, plus typical preoperative antibiotics, cut surgical site infections by 59% in obese women who had a cesarean delivery.
Presurgical skin preparation with a novel 2% chlorhexidine gluconate cloth reduces rates of surgical site infection in orthopaedic surgical patients.
Up till now, no such attempt has been made to substantiate the role of suture material towards the induction of surgical site infection by resuturing the incision site.
Hawn, "Oral antibiotic bowel preparation significantly reduces surgical site infection rates and readmission rates in elective colorectal surgery," Annals of Surgery, vol.
Rogers Jr., "Percent body fat and prediction of surgical site infection," Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol.
Garry A statement read: "During April our infection prevention team noted a subtle rise in surgical site infections, which while small, was higher than we expect.
healthcare system more than $35 billion annually, with Centers for Disease Control figures suggesting that surgical site infections account for more than 30 percent of all HAIs in hospitalized patients.
While multiple studies in several settings have found non-sterile gloves are non-inferior to sterile gloves in preventing surgical site infection after minor skin surgeries, this single study in the primary care office setting may not be enough to sway family physicians from ingrained habits.
Can we deduce from this that surgical site infection will absolutely be eliminated as a result of lower contamination alone?
* Reduce surgical site infection admission and readmission by 30% from the 2015 baseline.