I

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I

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that it is the third preferred bond of the company.

I

1. On a stock transaction table, a symbol indicating that a dividend was paid after a stock split.

2. A symbol appearing next to a bond listed on NASDAQ indicating that the bond is a company's third preferred bond. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if the letter "I" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is a third preferred bond.

i

Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables to indicate that the dividend was paid after a stock dividend or split: Lehigh s.20i.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A 48-HOUR COURSE of postoperative cephalexin and metronidazole, plus typical preoperative antibiotics, cut surgical site infections by 59% in obese women who had a cesarean delivery.
Surgical Site Infections (SSI) are defined as an infection that occurs at the incision site within thirty days after surgery.
Up till now, no such attempt has been made to substantiate the role of suture material towards the induction of surgical site infection by resuturing the incision site.
Strategies to prevent surgical site infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 update.
Surveillance of surgical site infections with feedback of appropriate data to surgeons would be desirable to reduce SSI rates.
However, the study did not confirm in the face of innumerable risk factors for SSIs in orthopaedic surgery, it is possible to decrease the incidence of surgical site infections with the use of simple protocols which are relatively easy to control in the perioperative period, and propose no additional known risk to our patients.
The association of ultraclean air ventilation systems with increased rates of surgical site infections in an epidemiologic evaluation (9) has sparked a debate on the benefit of such systems to prevent surgical site infection in a range of settings for which it has been shown to be effective (8,21-23).
Not one surgical specialty is immune from the prospect of a potential life threatening surgical site infection.
Centre for Disease Control (CDC, USA) definition for SSIs was used to identify the infected patients which states that "Infection would be regarded as surgical site infection if it occurs within 30 days of procedure and has at least one of the following symptoms; purulent drainage from the wound, pain or tenderness, localised swelling, redness, malodour, or fever.
While multiple studies in several settings have found non-sterile gloves are non-inferior to sterile gloves in preventing surgical site infection after minor skin surgeries, this single study in the primary care office setting may not be enough to sway family physicians from ingrained habits.
Keywords: Antibiotic prophylaxis, Herniorrhaphy, Inguinal hernia, Surgical site infection.